First among Friends: George Fox and the Creation of Quakerism

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Oxford University Press, Jan 4, 1996 - History - 407 pages
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In First Among Friends, the first scholarly biography of George Fox (1624-91), H. Larry Ingle examines the fascinating life of the reformation leader and founding organizer of the Religious Society of Friends, more popularly known today as the Quakers. Ingle places Fox within the upheavals of the English Civil Wars, Revolution, and Restoration, showing him and his band of "rude" disciples challenging the status quo, particularly during the Cromwellian Interregnum. Unlike leaders of similar groups, Fox responded to the conservatism of the Stuart restoration by facing down challenges from internal dissidents, and leading his followers to persevere until the 1689 Act of Toleration. It was this same sense of perseverance that helped the Quakers to survive and remain the only religious sect of the era still existing today. This insightful study uses broad research in contemporary manuscripts and pamphlets, many never examined systematically before. Firmly grounded in primary sources and enriched with gripping detail, this well-written and original study reveals unknown sides of one who was clearly "First Among Friends."
 

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Contents

The Sea Refuses No River
3
1 Every Oak Has Been an Acorn
7
2 Lads Will Be Men
18
3 The Longest Way About Is the Nearest Way Home
28
4 Seek Your Salve Where You Get Your Sore
41
5 When the Fox Preaches then Beware Your Geese
54
6 The North for Greatness
72
7 Put Not Fire to Flax
90
12 As Easy as Removing Tottenham Wood
170
13 For the Same Man to Be a Heretic and a Good Subject is Impossible
189
14 More Belongs to a Marriage than Four Bare Legs in a Bed
207
15 What Is a Man but His Mind?
229
16 A Man May Cut Himself with His Own Knife
250
17 The Fox Runs as Long as He Has Feet
266
A Good Life Makes a Good Death
283
Notes
287

8 As Like an Apple as an Oyster
107
9 Out of the North All Ill Comes Forth
118
10 I Thank God and my Cunning
136
11 No Time like the Present
153
Bibliography
359
Index
399
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