Kwaidan

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2004 - Fiction - 240 pages
2 Reviews
"Kwaidan" means "weird tales." Lafcadio Hearn has taken kwaidan and written some amazing, hair-raising tales of long ago--delicate, transparent, ghostly sketches of a world unreal, but with a haunting sense of spiritual reality. It is a unique collection of haunting Japanese supernatural stories written by a Westerner who adopted Japan as his homeland.
 

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Review: Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things

User Review  - Goodreads

A gift from a friend. Whether you're a fan of Japanese culture/folklore or a fan of horror -- actually, I'd say these more closely relates to the "haints" that my grandparents and other, older ... Read full review

Review: Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things

User Review  - Goodreads

These stories are quite unexpected, surely bizarre, but each of them somehow relates to our modern lives. It was a pure coincidence that I found this book in the mostly forgotten Japanese shelf of the ... Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
23
III
29
IV
39
V
45
VI
53
VII
65
VIII
77
XII
121
XIII
139
XIV
145
XV
159
XVI
165
XVII
173
XVIII
181
XIX
207

IX
83
X
103
XI
111
XX
215
Copyright

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Page 16 - Form is emptiness; and emptiness is form. Emptiness is not different from form; form is not different from emptiness. What is form — that is emptiness. What is emptiness — that is form.

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About the author (2004)

Born in Greece to an Irish soldier and a Greek mother, Lafcadio Hearn emigrated to the United States at the age of nineteen. While working as a newspaperman in Cincinnati, Ohio, Hearn married a black woman, which was then illegal, and fled to New Orleans to escape prosecution. Once there, he began to work for the New Orleans Item. During his time in New Orleans, Hearn published several books while continuing his work as a journalist.

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