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Books Books 1 - 10 of 24 on Science, that it would be an error to suppose that the great discoverer seizes at....
" Science, that it would be an error to suppose that the great discoverer seizes at once upon the truth, or has any unerring method of divining it. In all probability the errors of the great mind exceed in number those of the less vigorous one. Fertility... "
Proceedings - Page 156
by Homeopathic Medical Society of the State of Ohio - 1885
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The Principles of Science: Book IV. Inductive investigation. Book V ...

William Stanley Jevons - Logic - 1874
...truth are among the first requisites of discovery ; but the erroneous guesses must almost of necessity be many times as numerous as those which prove well...may pass through the teeming brain, and no record may remain of more than the hundredth part. There is nothing intrinsically absurd except that which...
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The Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method, Volume 1

William Stanley Jevons - Logic - 1874 - 480 pages
...truth are among the first requisites of discovery ; but the erroneous guesses must almost of necessity be many times as numerous as those which prove well...theories, may pass through the teeming brain, and no If genius, indeed, ^ *** b7 what is common, H mU8t necessar yond tie domain of the ordinan theless,...
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The Principles of Science: Book IV. Inductive investigation. Book V ...

William Stanley Jevons - Logic - 1874
...In all probability the errors of the great mind far exceed in number those of the less vigorous one. Fertility of imagination and abundance of guesses...requisites of discovery; but the erroneous guesses must almost of necessity be many times as numerous as those which prove well founded. The weakest analogies,...
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The Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method

William Stanley Jevons - Science - 1877 - 786 pages
...it. In all probability the errors of the great mind exceed in number those of the less vigorous one. Fertility of imagination and abundance of guesses at truth are among the first requisites of disco very; but the erroneous guesses must be many times as numerous as those which prove well founded....
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The Phrenological Journal and Life Illustrated, Volumes 72-73

Phrenology - 1880
...are among the first requisites of the discoverer ; but the erroneous guesses must almost of necessity be many times as numerous as those which prove well founded. The weakest and the most absurd theories apparently, the most whimsical notions, may pass through the teeming brain...
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Aspects of Scepticism: With Special Reference to the Present Time

John Fordyce - Faith - 1883 - 274 pages
...is the actual fact, and that the great man is ever making, and also ever abandoning, hypotheses. ' Fertility of imagination and abundance of guesses...truth are among the first requisites of discovery.' It would almost appear as if in the mind of a great discoverer opposite qualities must be combined....
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The American Journal of Psychology, Volume 8

Karl M. Dallenbach, Madison Bentley, Edwin Garrigues Boring, Margaret Floy Washburn - Psychology - 1897
...probability," says Jevons, " the errors of the great mind exceed in number those of the less vigorous one. Fertility of imagination and abundance of guesses...truth are among the first requisites of discovery."' Faraday said : " The world little knows how many of the thoughts and theories which have passed through...
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The American Journal of Psychology, Volume 8

Karl M. Dallenbach, Madison Bentley, Edwin Garrigues Boring, Margaret Floy Washburn - Psychology - 1897
...probability," says Jevons, " the errors of the great mind exceed in number those of the less vigorous one. Fertility of imagination and abundance of guesses at truth are among the first requisites of discovery."1 Faraday said : " The world little knows how many of the thoughts and theories which have...
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The meaning of organic evolution

Ralph Vary Chamberlin - Evolution - 1911 - 138 pages
...the truth or the interpretation that proves to accord with all the facts. Thus we see why "ferility of imagination and abundance of guesses at truth are...times as numerous as those which prove well founded" (Jevons). For every hypothesis that stands the test of time and becomes a law, hundreds must be discarded...
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The Function of Socialization in Social Evolution

Ernest Watson Burgess - Civilization - 1916 - 237 pages
...the great discoverer seizes at once upon the truth, or has any unerring method of divining it. ... Fertility of imagination and abundance of guesses...times as numerous as those which prove well founded." 2 ^Source Book for Social Origins, 1909, pp. 166-67. 2Principles of Science, 1874, p. 577. 21 An analysis...
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