Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology, Volume 2

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W. Pickering, 1836 - Bible and geology
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Page 108 - The following observations by the same gentleman in a recent communication to the Geological Society of London, (April, 1836,) appear to contain the rudiments of a Theory, which, when maturely developed, promises to offer a solution of this difficult and complex Problem. "If it be admitted that fissures may have been produced by changes in the temperature of the earth, there can be little difficulty in also admitting that electricity may have powerfully influenced the existing arrangement of the...
Page ii - ... human body. We should see the same concatenation and subserviency, the same necessity and usefulness, the same beauty and harmony, in all and every of its parts, as what we discover in the body of every single animal.
Page 85 - Europseus, which in early life is fixed by its stem to other bodies, is produced from the ovum of the Comatula, and becomes afterwards detached, and forms a perfect Comatula, capable of moving freely in the Ocean ; at one time crawling amongst sub-marine Plants, at others floating, or swimming like Medusae. (See Proceedings of Royal Society, London, June, 1835.) Fig. 3. Small Briarean Pentacrinite, adhering to a fragment of Jet from the Lias at Lyme Regis. (See V. I. p. 437, Note.) Fig. 4. Fragment...
Page 110 - Paris, raising water to supply a Canal basin, from two strata at different depths. The water from the lowest stratum rises to the greatest height. See VI p. 562. Note. (Hericart de Thury.) and deposited in the East and West veins, and near the rocks to which they were determined by the electric currents." In a Letter to the Author upon this subject (June 29, 1836), Mr. Fox further remarks. " It should be observed that in proportion as the deposition of the metals proceeded, the voltaic action must...
Page 106 - The term Combe, so common in the names of upland Villages, is usually applied to that unwatered portion of a valley, which forms its continuation beyond, and above the most elevated spring that issues into it; at this point, or spring head, the valley ends, and the Combe begins. The...
Page 110 - ... more than sufficient, if we deduct the oxide of tin, and other metalliferous oxides found in our mines. The continued circulation of the waters would, in time, bring most of the soluble salts under the influence of...
Page 40 - ... of a more slender character, measuring from fifteen to sixteen inches long, exclusive of a remarkable appendage extending backwards from the heel eight or nine inches, and apparently intended, like a snow-shoe, to sustain the weight of a heavy animal walking on a soft bottom. The impressions of this appendage resemble those of wiry feathers, or coarse bristles, which seem to have sunk into the mud and sand nearly an...
Page 80 - Stomach, and a series of lower cavities, or hollow lenticular spaces, between the central portions of the enlarged joints of the upper portion of the vertebral column. Miller considers these spaces as enlargements of the alimentary canal, which descends through the axis of the entire column. The surfaces of the joints of the vertebral column are striated with rays, which articulate with corresponding rays on the adjacent Plates, and allow of flexure without risk of dislocation ; locking into one...
Page 84 - VI p. 434, and 439. Fig. 1. Pentacrinites Briareus, (nat. size) on a slab of Lias from Lyme Regis, covered with a large group of the same animals, in the collection of the Geological Society of London. (Original.) Fig. 2. Rare and beautiful specimen of Briarean Pentacrinite, from the Lias at Lyme Regis, in the collection of Mr. Johnson, of Bristol, shewing the plated integument of the abdominal cavity, terminated upwards by a flexible Proboscis, and surrounded by the commencement of the arms and...
Page 19 - From the near approximation of this Animal to the living Tapir, we may infer that it was furnished with a Proboscis, by means of which it conveyed to its mouth the Vegetables it raked from the bottom of Lakes and Rivers by its Tusks and Claws. The bifid ungual bone (Каир, Add.

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