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I read this book by Edward Conlon recently.  It was a worthy read and gave good insight on the life of an NYPD cop.  Ed Conlon documents his career in this book as a NYPD cop who works for one of the worst housing projects in the Bronx.  His career is marked by intense and harrowing moments as a cop who has a pretty formidable task.  By reading this book, I was given much needed insight and first-hand testimony to advance my own work of art or better yet a Hollywood movie called The Fixer.  The movie has no link to the book but the book was a perfect reference or guide to live out the life of a cop in a movie.  In the movie, I play a lone cop who is a smooth-talking point man as "the Fixer" and in the book, Conlon is a gritty NYC cop who must live out the harsh realities of a Bronx housing project.  In the movie, Paul Case is a lone cop who plays by his own rules to get his way and in the book, Conlon is a standalone cop who seems like the pulp of the NYPD.  Conlon's book is a powerful book that is set in the crime-ridden era of the 90's and ends among the aftermath of 9/11.  It is not like any other book since it is a lone book that testifies to the real life interactions of a cop in the toughest city in the world, unlike the movie that is so much like other movies that are devoted to the same genre, albeit I would like to think that The Fixer has some parallel to the life of a cop like Conlon who seemed to work in the same milieu.  In the movie, Case must go up against a cartel that is wreaking havoc in the city and in the book, Conlon must weed out anyone who deals drugs or could be linked to a crime in the worst housing projects in the city.  Conlon's book is a specialized book that truly stands out as a tell-all book that details the life and inner workings of the NYPD, casually told by an Irish cop who came from a family of immigrants and seems to accustomed to the hard-hitting streets of New York and the nature of his job.  Most of all, it is the real-life stories of interactions with families, victims and felons that Conlon has faced in his career that are the most telling if not the whistle-blowing nature of the book that screams somewhat foul of the bureaucratic order of the NYPD.  But Conlon's work on the book is executory and brings light to an otherwise dark world, making light of intense situations that Conlon plays off with a Irish brogue and charisma that seems surreal that almost makes him akin to a Cassanova  cop like Paul Case though the two could be highly interplayed. While the book has no relation to the hit show by the same name, it does have some bearing to the movies stars who might play the same kind of roles but the hard-hitting book and hard-hitting style of Conlon is too procedural to ever be linked to a Hollywood movie in my opinion.  As a matter of fiction, the book is not the easiest read since it is replete with gruesome details of real-life muggings, shootings, robberies and murders and also the most stark detail, is the acute sense of the risk of being a NYPD detective and with emphatic appeal to show the hatred and rebuke that is faced by the NYPD and makes them subject to retribution or worst yet, cop killings.  It is a staggering note for a writer and actor to read a book that was surely a perfect incantation of my life as a long-time NYC resident and an actor who used the book as a creative source but most of all, to put into perspective the life and work of a NYPD cop who must take on the worst cases as a housing project cop who seems to have no silver streak or lining than the stars on his collar or a simply the glum of hope or satisfaction of making things right when so much seems wrong in the hierarchy of the NYPD that Conlon pays homage or the projects that he is accustomed to roam and the truly gruesome intercessions that line the book like a police detail.  So one is obliged to hail Conlon as a brave cop who somehow outlived and outlasted a truly remarkable life.    

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