Spinoza's Political and Ethical Philosophy

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J. Maclehose and Sons, 1903 - Ethics - 516 pages
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Page 158 - What shall we say then? Is the law sin? God forbid. Nay, I had not known sin, but by the law: for I had not known lust, except the law had said, Thou shalt not covet.
Page 230 - In my own heart love had not been made wise To trace love's faint beginnings in mankind, To know even hate is but a mask of love's, To see a good in evil, and a hope In ill-success...
Page 32 - O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, "Why hast thou made me thus ?" Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?
Page 255 - Who, doomed to go in company with Pain, And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train ! Turns his necessity to glorious gain...
Page 168 - Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high, I cannot attain unto it.
Page 230 - To trace love's faint beginnings in mankind, To know even hate is but a mask of love's, To see a good in evil, and a hope In ill-success ; to sympathize, be proud Of their half-reasons, faint aspirings, dim Struggles for truth, their poorest fallacies, Their prejudice and fears and cares and doubts ; All with a touch of nobleness, despite Their error, upward tending all though weak, Like plants in mines which never saw the sun, But dream of him, and guess where he may be, And do their best to climb...
Page 117 - An emotion, which is a passion, ceases to be a passion, as soon as we form a clear and distinct idea thereof.
Page 38 - In the mind there is no absolute or free will, but the mind is determined to this or that volition by a cause, which is also determined by another cause, and this again by another, and so on ad infinitum.
Page 108 - Things are conceived by us as actual in two ways; either in so far as we conceive them to exist with relation to a fixed time and place, or in so far as we conceive them to be contained in God, and to follow from the necessity of the divine nature.
Page 201 - If Thou be one whose heart the holy forms Of young imagination have kept pure, Stranger ! henceforth be warned; and know, that pride. Howe'er disguised in its own majesty, Is littleness ; that he, who feels contempt For any living thing, hath faculties Which he has never used ; that thought with him Is in its infancy.

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