Country Life: A Handbook of Agriculture, Horticulture, and Landscape Gardening

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J.P. Jewett and Company, 1860 - Agriculture - 814 pages
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Page 652 - And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then Heaven tries earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays; Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten; Every clod feels a stir of might, An instinct within it that reaches and towers...
Page 654 - Tis as easy now for the heart to be true As for grass to be green or skies to be blue, — 'Tis the natural way of living: Who knows whither the clouds have fled?
Page 652 - And what is so rare as a day in June ? Then, if ever, come perfect days ; Then Heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays : Whether we look, orwhether we listen.
Page 449 - Sheep-stock thrive where previously a few dairy-cows starved j the produce has been trebled, the rental raised, and the demand for labor increased in proportion. In the neighborhood of Yorkshire manufactories, moorland not worth a shilling an acre has been converted into dairy-farms worth two pounds. When it is remembered that the principle upon which these results depend was not enunciated till 1843, it will be seen how rapid and mighty has been the recent progress in agriculture.
Page 53 - Parkes' experiments were made simultaneously on a drained and on an undrained portion of the moss ; and the result was, that, on a mean of 35 observations, the drained soil at 7 inches in depth was 10 warmer than the undrained at the same depth. The undrained soil never exceeded 47, whereas after a thunder-storm the drained reached 66 at 7 inches, and 48 at 31 inches. Such were the effects at an early period of the year on a black bog. They suggest some idea of what they are, when in July...
Page 526 - Again, in page 181, he says : " In the solid and liquid excrements of man and of animals, we restore to our fields the ashes of the plants which served to nourish these animals. These ashes consist of certain soluble salts and insoluble earths which a fertile soil must yield, for they are indispensable to the growth of cultivated plants. It cannot admit of a doubt that, by introducing these excrements to the soil, we give to it the power of affording food to a new crop, or, in other •words, we...
Page 53 - His thermometers were sunk in the soil only to the depth of -f^ of an inch. In that sunny clime he found the mean heat of soil, at that depth, to be at noon, for six successive months, 131. If that were his mean heat for six months, we cannot doubt that it is frequently obtained as an extreme heat in the hottest portion of our year in England.
Page 449 - ... seed, or manure. Thorough draining not only diminishes the cost of ploughing, but it renders it possible to grow great crops of roots — of mangold-wurzel from thirty to thirty-five tons an acre, and of turnips from twenty to twenty-five tons. Ten times more live stock is thus fed on the land than it maintained before. The corn crop follows the roots in due course without further manuring, and is made certain in addition, even in wet seasons. The well-shaped modern plough saves in...
Page 51 - Ib. of water by filtration, no effect is produced beyond what is due to the relative temperatures of the rain and of the soil. Mr. Dickenson, the eminent paper-maker, who has several mills and a considerable landed estate in Hertfordshire, has deduced from a series of observations, which are we believe entitled to great confidence, that of an annual fall of '26 in.
Page 168 - ... this will leave them 18 and 6 inches respectively above the surface of the ground. To these posts, on the inside all round, nail inch boards from the bottom of the pit to the surface of the ground; this leaves a space 6 inches wide between the boards and the sides of the cellar; fill this space with oak tan or manure, well trodden or rammed. Now nail inch boards to both sides of the joists above ground, and fill the space between with well rammed tan. You have now a pit the top of which slopes...

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