Supersymmetry and String Theory: Beyond the Standard Model

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 4, 2007 - Science
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The past decade has witnessed dramatic developments in the field of theoretical physics. This book is a comprehensive introduction to these recent developments. It contains a review of the Standard Model, covering non-perturbative topics, and a discussion of grand unified theories and magnetic monopoles. It introduces the basics of supersymmetry and its phenomenology, and includes dynamics, dynamical supersymmetry breaking, and electric-magnetic duality. The book then covers general relativity and the big bang theory, and the basic issues in inflationary cosmologies before discussing the spectra of known string theories and the features of their interactions. The book also includes brief introductions to technicolor, large extra dimensions, and the Randall-Sundrum theory of warped spaces. This will be of great interest to graduates and researchers in the fields of particle theory, string theory, astrophysics and cosmology. The book contains several problems, and password protected solutions will be available to lecturers at www.cambridge.org/9780521858410.
 

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errata online:
http://scipp.ucsc.edu/~dine/book/book.html

Contents

17
243
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259
19
269
20
305
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313
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341
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359
24
365

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25
373
the KaluzaKlein program
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26
401
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441
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467
30
475

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Page 40 - Now, one can evaluate the matrix element, using eA+B = eAeB-(l/2)[A,B] (provided that the commutator is a c-number), giving (2.35) where c is a numerical constant. So the overlap vanishes with the volume. You can convince yourself that the same holds for matrix elements of local operators. This result does not hold in 0 + 1 and 1 + 1 dimensions, because of the severe infrared behavior of theories in low dimensions. This is known to particle physicists as Coleman's theorem, and to condensed matter...

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About the author (2007)

Michael Dine is Professor of Physics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is an A. P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Prior to this Professor Dine was a Research Associate at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, a long-term member of the Institute for Advanced Study, and Henry Semat Professor at the City College of the City University of New York.

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