QDR 2001: Strategy-Driven Choices for America's Security

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DIANE Publishing
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Contents

III
3
IV
25
V
75
VI
107
VII
137
VIII
167
IX
193
X
217
XII
235
XIII
263
XIV
293
XV
319
XVI
351
XVII
373
XVIII
383
XIX
387

XI
235

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 70 - Superiority: the capability to collect, process, and disseminate an uninterrupted flow of information while exploiting or denying an adversary's ability to do the same.
Page 66 - Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996).
Page 70 - Anthony H. Cordesman and Abraham R. Wagner, The Lessons of Modern War, Volume IV: The Gulf War (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1996), 879-915.
Page 47 - The essence of war will not change. Despite the proliferation of highly sophisticated and remote means of attack, the essence of war will remain the same. There will be casualties, carnage, and death; it will not be like a video game. What will change will be the kinds of actors and the weapons available to them. While some societies will attempt to limit violence and damage, others will seek to maximize them, particularly against those societies with a lower tolerance for casualties. 12. US intelligence...
Page 293 - ... is either imminent or already under way. The RMA thesis holds that further advances in precision munitions, real-time data dissemination, and other modern technologies can help transform the nature of future war and with it the size and structure of the US military. RMA proponents believe that military technology, and the resultant potential for radically new types of warfighting tactics and strategies, is advancing at a rate unrivaled since the...
Page 138 - The art and science of developing and using political, economic, psychological, and military forces as necessary during peace and war, to afford the maximum support to policies, in order to increase the probabilities and favorable consequences of victory and to lessen the chances of defeat.
Page 345 - Statement by Director of Central Intelligence George J. Tenet Before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on The Worldwide Threat in 2000: Global Realities of Our National Security 2 February 2000 Introduction Mr.
Page 66 - However, they will generally operate on the basis of national interests and demonstrate a flexibility that reflects acceptance of the realities of a globally interdependent world.
Page 316 - Joseph S. Nye Jr. and William A. Owens, "America's Information Edge," Foreign Affairs, March-April 1996, pp.
Page 32 - ... security partner of choice. Nevertheless, the world remains a dangerous and highly uncertain place, and the United States likely will face a number of significant challenges to its security between now and 2015. First, we will continue to confront a variety of regional dangers. Foremost among these is the threat of coercion and large-scale, cross-border aggression against US allies and friends in key regions by hostile states with significant military power.

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