The Educational Journal of Virginia, Volume 6

Front Cover
Charles Henry Winston, Thomas Randolph Price, Richard McAllister Smith, D. Lee Powell, H. H. Harris, John Meredith Strother, John Patrick McGuire, Harry Fishburne Estill (F.), Rodes Massie, William Fayette Fox, Richard Ratcliffe Farr, John Lee Buchanan, George R. Pace
Educational Publishing House, 1874 - Education
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Page 341 - ... a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a terrace for a wandering xi and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention; or a shop for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Page 152 - Let knowledge grow from more to more, But more of reverence in us dwell; That mind and soul, according well, May make one music as before, But vaster.
Page 341 - ... to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation ; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession...
Page 457 - A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.
Page 551 - One of the illusions is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly until he knows that every day is Doomsday.
Page 255 - The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school, The watch-dog's voice that bayed the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind; These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
Page 559 - The more they are instructed, the less liable they are to the delusions of enthusiasm and superstition, which, among ignorant nations, frequently occasion the most dreadful disorders.
Page 495 - Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 471 - But if any provide not for his own, and especially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.
Page 542 - A SOUND mind in a sound body, is a short, but full description of a happy state in this world ; he that has these two, has little more to wish for ; and he that wants either of them, will be but little the better for any thing else.

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