The Theory and Practice of Musical Form: On the Basis of Ludwig Bussler's "Musikalische Formenlehre."

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G. Schirmer, 1883 - Composition (Music) - 260 pages
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Page 134 - Hence a decided melody of eight or sixteen bars was chosen, ending with a full close iii the tonic. After a rambling excursion through several keys and with no particular object, the principal subject was regained and an agreeable sense of contrast attained. Later on there grew out of the free section a second subject in a related key, and still later a third, which allowed the second to be repeated in the tonic. This variety closely resembles the first-movement form, the third subject taking the...
Page 152 - Their special functions are : To call the ear's attention to particular sounds in a series of versesounds or music-sounds, for the purpose of marking the intervals of time allotted to each bar, such interval being always that which elapses between any two sounds thus distinguished by the...
Page 18 - this tetrameter is therefore a composite rhythm, comprising four different tone-figures. 6. The most common constituent of melody is the rhythm of two measures—dimeter, which we shall therefore assume as the startingpoint of formal construction. CHAPTER II. SECTION. 7. To render the meter of a musical thought intelligible to the ear, it is requisite that this thought exceed the limit of one measure. For, it is only by the recurrence of the same elements of the meter (the same metrical parts) in...
Page 134 - Starting with a principal subject of definite form and length, the first idea naturally was to preserve this unchanged in key or form throughout the piece. Hence a decided melody of eight or sixteen bars (measures) was chosen, ending with a full close in the Tonic. After a rambling excursion through several keys, and with no particular object, the principal subject was regained and an agreeable sense of contrast attained. Later on there grew out of the free section a second subject in a related key,...
Page 15 - I. In a piece of music, embracing a series of measures, the rule is that all measures have (1) the same number of time-units (metrical parts) of equal length ; and (2) a uniform alternation of accent and non-accent; ie, the accent falls on the same metrical part in one measure as in another. The regularly recurring accent enables the ear to separate the measures one from another; for the eye, they are separated by means of the vertical line, called bar. 2. EHYTHM...
Page 3 - Poesie)—" is the result of the efforts, through thousands of years, of the most excellent masters, which every one cannot too soon appropriate to himself. It were a most insane delusion of misconceived originality, if each one were to go about on his own account fumbling for that which is already on hand in great perfection. Form is handed down, learned, imitated, otherwise progress in art would be out of the question,— every one would have to begin anew,

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