The Tyranny and Fall of Edward II 1321-1326

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 22, 2004 - History - 312 pages
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This book reassesses the unusually violent rule of Edward II and the Despensers between 1321 and 1326. It examines the social dislocation caused by Edward's execution of his opponents and the confiscation of their lands in 1322 and the perversion of the law which accompanied it. From an examination of a large amount of unpublished material, Mrs Fryde shows how an exceptionally grasping courtier, the younger Despenser, worked with an equally grasping king to produce for the one an enormously swollen landed estate and for the other a vast hoard of treasure. The new evidence brought to light suggests that it was greed for wealth rather than any spirit of innovation which brought the Exchequer reforms of these years. Queen Isabella's contribution to the king's overthrow and Edward's disastrous relations with her brother, the king of France, are worked out in detail and there is a separate chapter on the contribution of London to the downfall of the regime.
 

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Contents

The king and the magnates before
13
The rise of the Despensers
27
The civil war 13212
37
Imprisonments
58
the territorial settlement
69
Royal finance 13216
87
The Despensersspoils of power 13216
106
The defeat in Scotland 13223
119
London
165
3 Queen Isabellas invasion and the end of the regime
176
Edward IPs deposition and ultimate fate
195
The regime of Mortimer and Isabella
207
Properties of the Despensers Main
228
Notes
236
Cited classes of records at the Public Record Office
274
Bibliography
280

The French war
134
The opposition to royal tyranny 13226
149

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