Jitney: A Play in Two Acts

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Samuel French, Inc., 2002 - Drama - 80 pages
19 Reviews

Characters: 8 male, 1 female

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Set in 1970 in the Hill District of Pittsburgh that is served by a makeshift taxi company, Jitney is a beautiful addition to the author's decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

"Explosive... Crackles with theatrical energy."-N.Y. Daily News

"Could be described as just a lot of men sitting around talking. But the talk has such varied range and musicality, and it is rendered with such stylish detail, that a complete urban symphony emerges.... Drivers return from jobs with stories that summon an entire ethos.... Throughly engrossing, Jitney holds us in charmed captivity."- New York Times

"Comic, soulful and immensely moving."-Time Out

"A transport of delight! So vividly written ... it keeps you steadily amused, concerned and moved."-New York Magazine

Winner of the New York Drama Critics Award for Best New Play and the Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Off Broadway Play.


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Review: Jitney (The Century Cycle #8)

User Review  - Drew - Goodreads

This was the first August Wilson play I ever saw (in an unforgettable production at the Union Square Theatre) but I'd never read the script itself until now and it's just as wonderful on the page as ... Read full review

Review: Jitney (The Century Cycle #8)

User Review  - Mike - Goodreads

With Jitney, I found a return to real richness of character that I felt was lacking in Two Trains Running. There's a kind of timelessness to the story and except for the references to different wars ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Playwright August Wilson was born on April 27, 1945 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His experiences of living in a primarily black community and then being the only black student in his class at a Roman Catholic high school would inform his dramatic writings. He dropped out of school at the age of 15 and continued his education on his own. Wilson wrote a ten play cycle that chronicles each decade of the black experience in the 20th century. Each of his plays focuses on what he perceived as the largest issue to confront African-Americans in that decade. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Fences and Piano Lesson, the best play Tony Award for Fences, and seven New York Drama Critics' Circle awards. He also received the Whiting Foundation Award, the American Theatre Critics Award, the 1999 National Humanities Medal awarded by the President, and numerous honorary degrees. He died of liver cancer on October 2, 2005 at the age of 60.

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