Northanger Abbey

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[R.] Bentley, [& son,], 1882 - 429 pages
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

Northanger Abbey: Such fun. This playful novel, filled with meta-references, send-ups to gothic tropes, &c., is right is my wheelhouse, and I absolutely loved it. Persuasion: It was really interesting ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ImperfectCJ - LibraryThing

I picked this up for Persuasion, but I like Northanger Abbey better. I like the self-conscious poking fun of novels, their readers, and those critical of them. I found Catherine Morland to be a very ... Read full review

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Page 19 - It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda; " or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.
Page 151 - ... Remember the country and the age in which we live. Remember that we are English, that we are Christians. Consult your own understanding, your own sense of the probable, your own observation of what is passing around you. Does our education prepare us for such atrocities? Do our laws connive at them? Could they be perpetrated without being known, in a country like this, where social and literary intercourse is on such a footing, where every man is surrounded by a neighbourhood of voluntary spies,...
Page 225 - How eloquent could Anne Elliot have been, — how eloquent, at least, were her wishes, on the side of early warm attachment, and a cheerful confidence in futurity, against that over-anxious caution which seems to insult exertion and distrust Providence ! — She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older — the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.
Page 10 - How are your various dresses to be remembered, and the particular state of your complexion, and curl of your hair to be described in all their diversities, without having constant recourse to a journal? My dear madam, I am not so ignorant of young ladies...
Page 251 - Wentworth's, a bow, a courtesy passed ; she heard his voice ; he talked to Mary, said all that was right, said something to the Miss Musgroves, enough to mark an easy footing ; the room seemed full, full of persons and voices, but a few minutes ended it. Charles shewed himself at the window, all was ready, their visitor had bowed and was gone, the Miss Musgroves were gone too, suddenly resolving to walk to the end of the village with the sportsmen ; the room was cleared, and Anne might finish her...
Page 416 - WHO can be in doubt of what followed? When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort...
Page 414 - I have been thinking over the past, and trying to judge of the right and wrong — I mean with regard to myself; and I must believe that I was right, much as I suffered from it — that I was perfectly right in being guided by the friend whom you will love better than you do now. To me, she was in the place of a parent. Do not mistake me, however. I am not saying that she did not err in her service. It was, perhaps, one of those cases in which advice is good or bad only as the event decides and for...
Page 102 - Her passion for ancient edifices was next in degree to her passion for Henry Tilney, and castles and abbies made usually the charm of those reveries which his image did not fill.
Page 403 - ... of it which has occurred within our own circle; many of which circumstances (perhaps those very cases which strike us the most) may be precisely such as cannot be brought forward without betraying a confidence, or, in some respect, saying what should not be said.

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