The 18 Immutable Laws of Corporate Reputation: Creating, Protecting, and Repairing Your Most Valu

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Simon and Schuster, May 11, 2010 - Business & Economics - 320 pages
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The 18 immutable laws of corporate reputation: creating, protecting, and repairing your most valuable asset

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Given the corporate scandals involving Enron, Worldcom, and other U.S. companies, Alsop's new book on corporate reputations is certainly timely. Alsop (Wall Street Journal) offers a primer consisting ... Read full review

Contents

Maximize Your Most Powerful Asset
3
Know ThyselfMeasure Your Reputation
22
Learn to Play to Many Audiences
36
Live Your Values and Ethics
52
Be a Model Citizen
68
Convey a Compelling Corporate Vision
84
Create Emotional Appeal
100
KEEPING THAT GOOD REPUTATION
115
Speak with a Single Voice
179
Beware the Dangers of Reputation Ruboff
193
REPAIRING A DAMAGED REPUTATION
209
Manage Crises with Finesse
211
Fix It Right the First Time
232
Never Underestimate the Publics Cynicism
244
RememberBeing Defensive Is Offensive
257
If All Else Fails Change Your Name
271

Recognize Your Shortcomings
117
Stay Vigilant to EverPresent Perils
131
Make Your Employees Your Reputation Champions
145
Control the Internet Before It Controls You
162
Acknowledgments
287
Index
289
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About the author (2010)

Ronald J. Alsop, a news editor and senior writer at The Wall Street Journal, has many years of experience reporting on and supervising the coverage of corporate brands and reputations. He has served as the newspaper's marketing columnist and was editor of its Marketplace page. His previous books include The Wall Street Journal on Marketing and The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Top Business Schools. He is also a seasoned speaker at international conferences on corporate reputation and has worked closely with leading research firms that measure corporate reputation. He lives with his wife and son in Summit, New Jersey.

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