The Analysis of Household Surveys: A Microeconometric Approach to Development Policy

Front Cover
World Bank Publications, 1997 - Business & Economics - 479 pages
3 Reviews
Over the past 15 years, the availability of cheap and convenient microcomputers has changed the collection methods and analysis of household survey data in developing countries, making the data available within months, rather than years. Simultaneously, analysts have become more interested in exploring ways in which such data may be used to inform and improve the steps involved in policymaking. This book reviews the analysis of household survey data, including the construction of household surveys, the econometric tools that are the most useful for such analysis, and a range of problems in development policy for which the econometric analysis of household surveys is useful and informative. The author's approach remains close to the data, relying on transparent econometric and graphical techniques to present the data so that policy and academic debates are clearly informed.
 

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plz refer thars
i refered this and this said about social welfare function, in relation to pareto efficiency and pareto efficiency is a measure of total welfare change without considering extreme
and poor group..........
and importance of policy (checking policy) whether its effect on the overall population.
 

Contents

Individuals and households
23
Reporting periods
24
Measuring consumption
26
Measuring income
29
13 The Living Standards Surveys
32
Design features of LSMS surveys
34
What have we learned?
35
14 Descriptive statistics from survey data
40
the sampling variance of the mean
43
Using weights or inflation factors
44
sampling variation of probabilityweighted estimates
49
Twostage sampling and clusters
51
A superpopulation approach to clustering
56
Illustrative calculations for Pakistan
57
The bootstrap
58
15 Guide to further reading
61
Econometric issues for survey data
63
21 Survey design and regressions
66
Recommendations for practice
71
22 The econometrics of clustered samples
73
Estimating regressions from clustered samples
74
23 Heteroskedasticity and quantile regressions
78
Heteroskedasticity in regression analysis
79
Quantile regressions
80
calculating quantile regressions
83
Heteroskedasticity and limited dependent variable models
85
Robust estimation of censored regression models
89
Radical approaches to censored regressions
91
24 Structure and regression in nonexperimental data
92
Simultaneity feedback and unobserved heterogeneity
93
Example 2 Farm size and farm productivity
95
Example 3 The evaluation of projects
97
nutrition and productivity
98
Measurement error
99
Selectivity issues
101
25 Panel data
105
difference and withinestimation
106
Panel data and measurement error
108
Lagged dependent variables and exogeneity in panel data
110
26 Instrumental variables
111
Policy evaluation and natural experiments
112
Econometric issues for instrumental variables
115
27 Using a time series of cross sections
116
an example
117
Cohort data versus panel data
120
Panel data from successive cross sections
121
Decompositions by age cohort and year
123
28 Two issues in statistical inference
127
the delta method
128
Sample size and hypothesis tests
129
29 Guide to further reading
131
3 Welfare poverty and distribution
133
31 Living standards inequality and poverty
134
Inequality and social welfare
136
Measures of inequality
138
Poverty and social welfare
140
The construction of poverty lines
141
Measures of poverty
144
The choice of the individual welfare measure
148
Example 1 Inequality and poverty over time in Cote dlvoire
151
Example 2 Inequality and poverty by race in South Africa
156
inequality
157
Lorenz curves and inequality in South Africa and Cote dIvoire
160
Stochastic dominance
162
poverty
164
32 Nonparametric methods for estimating density functions
169
histograms
170
kernel estimators
171
examples
175
Extensions and alternatives
176
examples
180
33 Analyzing the distributional effects of policy
182
theory
183
the production and consumption of rice
187
Nonparametric regression analysis
191
Nonparametric regressions for rice in Thailand
194
locally weighted regression
197
The distributional effects of the social pension in South Africa
200
34 Guide to further reading
202
42 Intrahousehold allocation and gender bias
223
Gender bias in intrahousehold allocation
224
A theoretical digression
225
Adults children and gender
229
Empirical evidence from India
231
methodology
234
standard errors for outlayequivalent ratios
235
results
237
Cote dlvoire Thailand Bangladesh Pakistan and Taiwan China
238
theory and practice
241
Equivalence scales welfare and poverty
243
The relevance of household expenditure data
244
Costofliving indices consumers surplus and utility theory
245
calculating the welfare effects of price
246
Equivalence scales the cost of children and utility theory
247
The underidentification of equivalence scales
248
Engels method
251
Rothbarths method
255
Other models of equivalence scales
260
Economies of scale within the household
262
Utility theory and the identification of economies of scale
268
44 Guide to further reading
269
Looking at price and tax reform
271
51 The theory of price and tax reform for developing countries
273
Generalizations using shadow prices
277
Evaluation of nonbehavioral terms
278
Alternative approaches to measuring behavioral responses
279
52 The analysis of spatial price variation
283
Unit values and the choice of quality
288
Measurement error in unit values
292
53 Modeling the choice of quality and quantity
293
A strippeddown model of demand and unit values
294
Modeling quality
296
Estimating the strippeddown model
299
An example from Cote dlvoire
302
Functional form
303
crossprice effects
306
estimation
311
completing the system
314
54 Empirical results for India and Pakistan
315
the secondstage estimates for Pakistan
317
Maharashtra
320
55 Looking at price and tax reform
323
Shadow taxes and subsidies in Pakistan
324
Shadow taxes and subsidies in India
325
Adapting the price reform formulas
326
Equity and efficiency in price reform in Pakistan
328
Equity and efficiency in price reform in India
330
parametric and nonparametric analysis
332
57 Guide to further reading
334
Saving and consumption
335
61 Lifecycle interpretations of saving
337
Age profiles of consumption
339
Consumption and saving by cohorts
342
Estimating a lifecycle model for Taiwan China
345
62 Shortterm consumption smoothing and permanent income
350
Saving and weather variability
351
Saving as a predictor of income change?
354
63 Models of saving for poor households
357
the permanent income and lifecycle models
359
precautionary saving
361
Restrictions on borrowing
363
Borrowing restrictions and the empirical evidence
369
64 Social insurance and consumption
372
Consumption insurance in theory
375
Empirical evidence on consumption insurance
376
65 Saving consumption and inequality
383
empirical evidence
386
Aging and inequality
390
a tentative review
393
Motives consequences and policy
394
Saving and growth
395
Determinants of saving
397
67 Guide to further reading
399
Code appendix
401
Bibliography
439
Subject index
463
Author index
474
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Page 61 - ... is beyond the scope of this book. The interested reader is referred to the literature (46,47) for relatively easy treatments of these subjects.
Page 113 - No fewer than three hundred thousand people of both sexes, of every age and occupation, and of every rank and station, from gentlefolks down to the very poor, were divided into two groups without their choice, and, in most cases, without their knowledge; one group being supplied with water containing the sewage of London, and, amongst it, whatever might have come from the cholera patients, the other group having water quite free from such impurity.
Page 113 - In the subdistricts enumerated in the above table as being supplied by both Companies, the mixing of the supply is of the most intimate kind. The pipes of each Company go down all the streets, and into nearly all the courts and alleys. A few houses are supplied by one Company and a few by the other, according to the decision of the owner or occupier at that time when the Water Companies were in active competition. In many cases a single house has a supply different from that on either side.
Page 451 - The Permanent Income Hypothesis and Consumption Durability: Analysis Based on Japanese Panel Data.
Page 142 - Rs. 20 per capita per month at 1960-61 prices (excluding expenditure on health and education both of which were expected to be provided by the state according to the Constitution and in the light of its other commitments).
Page 6 - Some of the work reported here was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIAID/ AI38396) and from the United States Department of Agriculture (NRI/ 1999-02295) (to BAW).
Page 140 - The coefficient of variation is the standard deviation divided by the mean.

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