The Establishment of the Balkan National States, 1804-1920

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University of Washington Press, 1986 - History - 358 pages
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This highly readable and thoroughly researched volume offers an excellent account of the development of seven Balkan peoples during the nineteenth and the first part of the twentieth centuries. Professors Charles and Barbara Jelavich have brought their rich knowledge of the Albanians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Greeks, Romanians, Serbians, and Slovenes to bear on every aspect of the area s history--political, diplomatic, economic, social and cultural.

It took more than a century after the first Balkan uprising, that of the Serbians in 1804, for the Balkan people to free themselves from Ottoman and Habsburg rule. The Serbians and the Greeks were the first to do so; the Albanians, the Croatians, and the Slovenes the last. For each people the national revival took its own form and independence was achieved in its own way. The authors explore the contrasts and similarities among the peoples, within the context of the Ottoman Empire and Europe.

 

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Contents

1 The Ottoman Background
3
2 The Serbian Revolution
26
3 The Greek Revolution
38
4 The Autonomous Serbian State
53
5 The Greek Kingdom
68
6 Wallachia and Moldavia before 1853
84
the Reforms
99
8 The United Principalities to 1876
114
Internal Political Developments to 1914
170
13 The Expulsion of the Ottoman Empire from Europe
207
14 The Establishment of Albania
222
15 Balkan Nationalities in the Habsburg Empire
235
16 Balkan Cultural Developments
266
17 The First World War
284
18 The Postwar Settlements
298
19 Conclusion
320

9 The Bulgarian National Movement to 1876
128
10 The Crisis of the Seventies
141
11 Autonomous Bulgaria to 1896
158
Bibliographic Essay
329
Index
345
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About the author (1986)

Judith Thornton is professor of economics at the University of Washington. Charles E. Ziegler is professor and chair of political science at the University of Louisville.

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