International Law: Norms, Actors, Process : a Problem-oriented Approach

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Aspen Publishers, Jan 1, 2006 - Law - 1090 pages
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Author's Website: http://www.temple.edu/lawschool/drwiltext/
Illuminate the process of international lawmaking with this timely and
practical revision. INTERNATIONAL LAW: Norms, Actors, Process: A
Problem-Oriented Approach, Second Edition, uses compelling problems and an
interdisciplinary approach to lead students from fundamental to advanced
topics.
This efficient and effective casebook offers:
a distinguished team of authors, all known for their widely published writing
a real-life problem approach that illustrates the law in action -- for
example, genocide in Rwanda, state formation in the former Yugoslavia, and the
problem of ozone depletion in protecting the atmosphere -- and grounds
material for students to give the subject a contemporary connection
comprehensive, current, and well-balanced coverage of the field
engaging and challenging visuals, including maps, charts, and photographs
interdisciplinary materials incorporating perspectives from economics,
political science, and critical and feminist legal studies
a brief historical section to give students a deeper understanding of global
history
manageable length
an extensive Teacher's Manual containing a sample syllabus
clear and accessible notes and writing styles
useful author website (http://teaching.law.cornell.edu/faculty/drwcasebook/)
with key documents, updates, and related links
The Second Edition presents a wide range of new material:
developments, cases, and updated notes and questions relating to the war on
terrorism, the Iraq war, global warming/climate change, the law of occupation,
international law in U.S. courts, and the International Criminal Court
new cases: Sosa (the Alien Tort Claims Act), the ICJ and U.S. death penalty
and consular notification cases, the ICJ and the Israeli High Court on the
separation barrier, and U.S. courts on detainees held at Guantanamo and
elsewhere
new sections of the text deal with recent important topics and update existing
coverage

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Contents

Prefare
xxiii
III
xxiv
Authors Note
xxxv
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Jeffrey L. Dunoff is the Laura H. Carnell Professor of Law at Temple University Beasley School of Law, where he also serves as Director of the Institute for International Law and Public Policy. Dunoff has previously served as the Nomura Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School, as a Senior Visiting Research Scholar in the Law and Public Affairs program at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, as a Visiting Professor at Princeton University, and as a Visiting Fellow at the Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law at the University of Cambridge. His scholarship focuses on public international law; international regulatory regimes, with a specific focus on international economic law; and on interdisciplinary approaches to international law. He is co-author (with Steven Ratner and David Wippman) of a leading textbook, International Law: Actors, Norms, Process, and his writings have appeared in the American Journal of International Law, the European Journal of International Law, the Journal of International Economic Law and other publications.

Rosa Brooks is a Professor at Georgetown University Law Center and an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. She is a consultant for the Human Rights Watch and for the President's Office at the Open Society Institute. She was on the Board of Directors for Amnesty International USA from 2002 3 and a Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Kennedy School of Government from 2000 1. She also worked for the US Department of State as a Senior Advisor in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. Brooks is a weekly columnist for The Los Angeles Times. She has written articles for The Washington Post and Harpers and published in scholarly journals such as The University of Chicago Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Georgetown Law Review and The Yale Journal of Law and Feminism.

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