Beethoven and His Nine Symphonies

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Novello, 1896 - Symphonies - 407 pages
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Review: Beethoven and His Nine Symphonies

User Review  - Robin Friedman - Goodreads

Sir George Grove (1820 -1900)is best-known as the writer of the original "Dictionary of Music and Musicians" which, with its many updates and versions over the years, has become the standard English ... Read full review

Review: Beethoven and His Nine Symphonies

User Review  - David - Goodreads

A pleasure from start to finish. George Grove, whose name now stands atop music scholarship's most important resource (the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians), takes readers through the basic ... Read full review

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Page 71 - ... who seem'd so great. — Gone ; but nothing can bereave him Of the force he made his own Being here, and we believe him Something far advanced in State, And that he wears a truer crown Than any wreath that man can weave him. Speak no more of his renown, Lay your earthly fancies down, And in the vast cathedral leave him. God accept him, Christ receive him.
Page 75 - The invisible world, doth greatness make abode, There harbours; whether we be young or old, Our destiny, our being's heart and home, Is with infinitude, and only there ; With hope it is, hope that can never die, Effort, and expectation, and desire, And something evermore about to be.
Page 142 - The form is mechanic, when on any given material we impress a predetermined form, not necessarily arising out of the properties of the material ; as when to a mass of wet clay we give whatever shape we wish it to retain when hardened. The organic form, on the other hand, is innate; it shapes, as it develops, itself from within, and the fulness of its development is one and the same with the perfection of its outward form.
Page 391 - He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.
Page 377 - Wurf gelungen, Eines Freundes Freund zu sein, Wer ein holdes Weib errungen, Mische seinen Jubel ein! Ja — wer auch nur eine Seele Sein nennt auf dem Erdenrund! Und wer's nie gekonnt, der stehle Weinend sich aus diesem Bund.
Page 392 - ... by reiteration. The last movement, a chorus, is heterogeneous, and though there is much vocal beauty in parts of it, yet it does not, and no habit will ever make it, mix up with the first three movements. This chorus is a hymn to joy, commencing with a recitative, and relieved by many solo passages. What relation it bears to the Symphony we could not make out, and here, as well as in other parts, the want of intelligible design is too apparent.
Page 392 - But, with all the merits that it unquestionably possesses, it is at least twice as long as it should be; it repeats itself, and the subjects, in consequence, become weak by reiteration. The last movement, a chorus, is heterogeneous; and though there is much vocal beauty in parts of it, yet it does not, and no habit will ever make it, mix up with the first three movements. This chorus is a Hymn to Joy, commencing with a Recitative and relieved by many soli passages. What relation it bears to the Symphony...
Page 98 - Beethoven must have been inspired by the very genius of happiness when he conceived and worked out the many beautiful themes of this joyous composition, and threw in the spirited and graceful features which so adorn them.
Page 377 - Where thy gentle wings abide. Ye to whom the boon is measured, Friend to be of faithful friend, Who a wife has won and treasured, To our strain your voices lend! Yea, if any hold in keeping Only one heart all his own, Let him join us, or else weeping, Steal from out our midst, unknown. Draughts of joy, from cup o'erflowing, Bounteous Nature freely gives Grace to just and unjust showing, Blessing everything that lives. Wine she gave to us and kisses, Loyal friend on life's steep road, E'en the worm...
Page 352 - The first three movements might have had another Finale — indeed, they nearly had one (see No. 18) ; and it is not necessary to attempt to reconcile either the opening Allegro, the Scherzo (so called), or the Adagio with the train of thought and feeling suggested by the Ode which is embodied in the latter portion of the work.

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