The Life and Adventures of Bampfylde Moore Carew, Commonly Called the King of the Beggars: Being an Impartial Account of His Life, from His Leaving Tiverton School at the Age of Fifteen and Entering Into a Society of Gipsies : Wherein the Motives of His Conduct are Related and Explained

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book-sellers, 1835 - Romanies - 144 pages
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Page 130 - the parson knows but little of me, or the laws of our community, if he is ignorant that with us ingratitude is unknown, and the property of our friends always sacred.
Page 46 - In the morning the captain ordered public notice to be given of a day of sale, and the prisoners, who were pretty near a hundred, were all ordered upon deck, where a large bowl of punch was made, and the planters flocked on board; their first...
Page 22 - Carew asked him, if he did not remember a poor wretch who met him one day at his stable door, with an old stocking round his head instead of a cap, and an old woman's ragged mantle on his shoulders, no shirt on his back, nor stockings to his legs, and scarce any shoes...
Page 130 - Lord and his brother were running about to seek after their favourites. Mr. Carew asked my Lord what was the meaning of this hurry, and if his dogs were cripples, because he saw several carried in the servants arms ? adding, he hoped his Lordship did not imagine he was come to steal any of them. Upon -which his Lordship told him, that parson C , had advised him to be careful, as he had lost his spaniel but the day before. It may be so...
Page 11 - With this sword do justice, stop the growth of iniquity, protect the holy church of God, help and defend widows and orphans, restore the things that are gone to decay, maintain the things that are restored, punish and reform what is amiss, and confirm what is in good order...
Page 47 - When all the best tradesmen were brought up, a planter came to Mr. Carew, and asked him what trade he was of; Mr. Carew, to satisfy him of his uselessness, told him he was a rat-catcher, a mendicant, and a dog-merchant : what the d 1 trades are these, replied the planter in astonishment, for I have never before heard of them...
Page 6 - ... of his people. The laws of these people are few and simple, but most exactly and punctually observed ; the fundamental of which is, that strong love and mutual regard for each member in particular, and for the whole community in general, which is inculcated into them from their earliest infancy; so that this whole community is connected by stronger bands of love and harmony, than oftentimes subsist even in private families under other governments : this naturally prevents all oppressions, fraud,...
Page 46 - Their first inquiry was for letters and news from Old England, what passage he had, how their friends did, and the like. The Captain informed them of war being declared against Spain, and that it was expected it would soon be declared against France; that he had been eleven weeks and four days in his passage. Their next inquiry was if the Captain had brought them good store of joiners, carpenters, blacksmiths, weavers, and tailors.
Page 7 - ... amending the mind. Experience has shown them that, by keeping up this nice sense of honour and shame, they are always enabled to keep their community in better order than the most severe corporeal punishments have been able to effect in other governments. But what has still more tended to preserve their happiness is, that they know no other use of riches than the enjoyment of them ; but; as the word is liable to be misconstrued by many of our readers, we think it necessary to inform them, we...
Page 14 - ... he saw servants waste their master's substance, and that there were no greater nor more crafty thieves than domestic ones ; and met with masters who roared out for liberty abroad, acting the arbitrary tyrant in their own houses : — he saw ignorance and passion exercise the rod of justice ; oppression, the hand-maid of power; self-interest out-weighing friendship and honesty in the opposite scale; pride and envy spurning and trampling on what was more worthy than themselves ; — he saw the...

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