A Northern Summer: Or, Travels Round the Baltic, Through Denmark, Sweden, Russia, Prussia, and Part of Germany, in the Year 1804

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Samuel F. Bradford, 1805 - Europe, Northern - 306 pages
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Page 84 - Glory is like a circle in the water, Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself, Till, by broad spreading, it disperse to nought.
Page 56 - And in the porches of mine ears did pour The leperous distilment; whose effect Holds such an enmity with blood of man, That, swift as quicksilver, it courses through The natural gates and alleys of the body ; And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset And curd, like eager droppings into milk, The thin and wholesome blood...
Page 24 - ... when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind. When I read the several dates of the tombs, of" some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.
Page 114 - Now came still Evening on, and Twilight gray Had in her sober livery all things clad; Silence accompanied; for beast and bird, They to their grassy couch, these to their nests Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale. She all night long her amorous descant sung; Silence was pleased.
Page 39 - The quality of mercy is not strained. It droppeth, as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath : it is twice blessed ; It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes.
Page 61 - Do not strike him into that most dreadful of all human conditions, the orphanage that springs not from the grave, that falls not from the hand of Providence or the stroke of death ; but comes before its time, anticipated and inflicted by the remorseless cruelty of parental guilt.
Page 165 - Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume ; And we are weeds without it. All constraint, Except what wisdom lays on evil men, Is evil ; hurts the faculties, impedes Their progress in the road of science ; blinds The eyesight of discovery ; and begets, In those that suffer it a sordid mind, Bestial, a meagre intellect, unfit To be the tenant of man's noble form.
Page 256 - O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil ! lago.
Page 38 - Bernstoff, in gratitude for their liberation : 'Tis liberty alone that gives the flow'r Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume ; And we are weeds without it. COWPER. Curiosity led me one day into the principal court of judicature : it was a handsome large room, in a range of buildings in which the governor of the city resides : the throne was in front ; twelve judges presided attired in rich costume ; there were only two advocates present, who wore embroidered capes and blue silk gowns.
Page 301 - When icicles hang by the wall And Dick the shepherd blows his nail And Tom bears logs into the hall And milk comes frozen home in pail, When blood is nipp'd and ways be foul, Then nightly sings the staring owl, Tu-whit; Tu-who, a merry note, While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

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