Obedience to authority: an experimental view

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Harper & Row, 1974 - Social Science - 224 pages
43 Reviews
In the 1960s Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram famously carried out a series of experiments that forever changed our perceptions of morality and free will. The subjects--or "teachers"--were instructed to administer electroshocks to a human "learner," with the shocks becoming progressively more powerful and painful. Controversial but now strongly vindicated by the scientific community, these experiments attempted to determine to what extent people will obey orders from authority figures regardless of consequences. "Obedience to Authority" is Milgram's fascinating and troubling chronicle of his classic study and a vivid and persuasive explanation of his conclusions.

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Review: Obedience to Authority

User Review  - Scott Goddard - Goodreads

This was overall a scary read. It put into understandable text the psychological workings of the human mind when under the voice of authority, and the extent to which subordinates will only strive to ... Read full review

Review: Obedience to Authority

User Review  - Josh - Goodreads

If you've never heard of Milgram's obedience experiment, you should look it up. I don't know if I'd suggest starting with this book, since you don't really need the dozens of follow up studies showing ... Read full review

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Contents

The Dilemma of Obedience
1
Method of Inquiry
13
Expected Behavior
27
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Stanley Milgram taught social psychology at Yale University and Harvard University before becoming a Distinguished Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His honors and awards include a Ford Foundation fellowship, an -American Association for the Advancement of Science sociopsychological prize, and a Guggenheim fellowship. He died in 1984 at the age of fifty-one.

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