Power Development of Small Streams: A Book for All Persons Seeking Greater Comfort and Higher Efficiency in Country Homes, Towns and Villages

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Rodney Hunt machine Company, 1920 - Water-power - 165 pages
 

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Page 104 - Fig. 7, and fill from the gravel pile. Lift off the box and shovel the gravel on top of the sand and cement, spreading it as evenly as possible. With some experience, equally good results can be obtained by placing the gravel measuring box on top of the carefully leveled sand and cement mixture, and filling it, thus placing the gravel on top without an extra shoveling. This method is shown in Fig.
Page 162 - To find the area of a required pipe, the volume and velocity of water being given, multiply the number of cubic feet of water by 144 and divide the product by the velocity in feet per minute. The area being found, the diameter of pipe is readily figured.
Page 104 - In turning the shovel, do not simply dump the sand and cement at the points marked i and 2 in the diagram under the cut, but shake the materials off the end and sides of the shovel, so that the sand and cement are mixed as they fall. This is a great assistance in mixing these materials. In this way the material is shoveled from one side of the board to the other, as shown in Figs.
Page 165 - The mean pressure of the atmosphere is usually estimated at 14.7 pounds per square inch, so that with a perfect vacuum it will sustain a column of mercury 29.9 inches or a column of water 33.9 feet high at sea level. To find the pressure in pounds per square inch of a column of water, multiply the height of the column in feet by .434.
Page 105 - Be careful not to let too much water get near the edges of the pile, as it will run off, taking some cement with it. This caution, however, does not apply to a properly constructed mixing board, as the cement and water cannot get away. Starting the same as with the sand and cement, turn the materials over in much the same way, except that instead of shaking the materials off the end of the shovel, the whole shovel load is dumped as at points 1 or 2 in the diagram under Fig.
Page 162 - The velocity in feet per minute, necessary to discharge a 'given volume of water in a given time, is found by multiplying the number of cubic feet of water by 144 and dividing the product by the area of the pipe in inches.
Page 162 - X 3 = 7,260 -=- 11 = 66C the number of Miners' Inches sought. Useful Facts in Hydraulics.— Doubling the diameter of a pipe increases the capacity four times.
Page 162 - ... by the velocity per minute in feet, and divide the product by 33,000 (an allowance of 25 per cent, should be added for friction, etc.) To find the area of a required pipe, the volume and velocity of water being given, multiply the number of cubic feet of water by 144, and divide the product by...
Page 104 - Fig. 6 the second turning. The sand and cement should now be well mixed and ready for the stone and water. After the last turning, spread the sand and cement out carefully, place the gravel or stone measuring box beside it as shown in Fig.
Page 175 - Decimals of an Inch Fractions Decimals of an Inch Fractions Decimals of an Inch Fractions Decimals of an Inch л л А Л А • и?

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