Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black

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South End Press, 1989 - Social Science - 184 pages
4 Reviews
bell hooks writes about the meaning of feminist consciousness in daily life and about self-recovery, about overcoming white and male supremacy, and about intimate relationships, exploring the point where the public and private meet.
 

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User Review  - mbowen - LibraryThing

I'm one of those individuals who believes that frued was a fraud. and i might be indulging in some essentialist solopsism when i assert that there was never anything he said that would or could be of ... Read full review

Talking back: thinking feminist, thinking black

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Activist/academician hooks ( Ain't I a Woman: Black Women & Feminism and Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center ) has here collected 23 of her angry, intelligent, critical, and compelling essays on ... Read full review

Contents

some opening remarks
1
talking back
5
coming to voice
10
a transformational politic
19
on selfrecovery
28
a radical agenda
35
ethical issues
42
toward a revolutionary feminist pedagogy
49
a comment
105
a comment
112
homophobia in black communities
120
a comment
127
a feminist comment
134
creating more space
142
looking back
148
writing autobiography
155

reflections on graduate school
55
education as the practice of freedom
62
class and education
73
a feminist perspective
84
a comment
92
a comment
98
on using a pseudonym
160
interview
167
black women and feminism
177
bibliography
183
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About the author (1989)

Bell Hooks was born Gloria Watkins on September 25, 1952. She grew up in a small Southern community that gave her a sense of belonging as well as a sense of racial separation. She has degrees from Stanford University, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of California at Santa Cruz. She has served as a noted activist and social critic and has taught at numerous colleges. Hooks uses her great-grandmother's name to write under as a tribute to her ancestors. Hooks writes daring and controversial works that explore African-American female identities. In works such as Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism and Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black, she points out how feminism works for and against black women. Oppressed since slavery, black women must overcome the dual odds of race and gender discrimination to come to terms with equality and self-worth.

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