Rudiments of Public Speaking and Debate: Or, Hints on the Application of Logic

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McElrath and Barker, 1853 - Elocution - 129 pages
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Page 129 - MYSTERIOUS Night! when our first parent knew Thee from report divine, and heard thy name, Did he not tremble for this lovely frame, This glorious canopy of light and blue. Yet 'neath a curtain of translucent dew, Bathed in the rays of the great setting flame, Hesperus with the host of heaven came, And lo! creation widened in man's view.
Page 64 - For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working men, was perfectly sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we would so readily stake the fame of the old unpolluted English language ; no book which shows so well how rich that language is in its own proper wealth, and how little it has been improved by all that it has borrowed.
Page 126 - Think nothing gained," he cries, " till naught remain ; On Moscow's walls till Gothic standards fly, And all be mine beneath the Polar sky.
Page 64 - The style of Bunyan is delightful to every reader, and invaluable as a study to every person who wishes to obtain a wide command over the English language. The vocabulary is the vocabulary of the common people. There is not an expression, if we except a few technical terms of theology, which would puzzle the rudest peasant. We have observed several pages which do not contain a single word of mo're than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say.
Page 126 - But did not Chance at length her error mend? Did no subverted empire mark his end? Did rival monarchs give the fatal wound? Or hostile millions press him to the ground? His fall was destined to a barren strand, A petty fortress, and a dubious hand; He left the name, at which the world grew pale, To point a moral, or adorn a tale.
Page 125 - Perhaps (for who can guess th' effects of chance ?) Here Hunt may box, or Mahomet may dance. Hard is his lot that, here by Fortune placed, Must watch the wild vicissitudes of taste ; With every meteor of caprice must play. And chase the new-blown bubbles of the day. Ah ! let not censure term our fate our choice, The stage but echoes back the public voice ; The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, For we that live to please, must please to live.
Page 63 - tis a greater mystery, in the art Of painting, to foreshorten any part Than draw it out, so 'tis in books the chief Of all perfections to be plain and brief.
Page 114 - An admonition to the people of England; Wherein are answered, not onely the slaunderous vntruethes, reprochfully vttered by MARTIN the Libeller, but also many other Crimes by some of his broode, objected generally against all Bishops, and the chiefe of the Cleargie, purposely to deface and discredite the present state of the Church.
Page 54 - Insist on yourself; never imitate. Your own gift you can present every moment with the cumulative force of a whole life's cultivation; but of the adopted talent of another, you have only an extemporaneous, half possession.
Page 125 - On what foundation stands the warrior's pride, How just his hopes, let Swedish Charles decide. A frame of adamant, a soul of fire, No dangers fright him, and no labours tire...

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