Andrew Johnson and Reconstruction

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Oxford University Press, 1988 - Computers - 533 pages
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An essential work on the Civil War period, this classic of Reconstruction scholarship challenges the longstanding myth of Andrew Johnson as misunderstood statesman, revealing him as a small-minded, vindictive, and stubborn man, whose rigid determination to defy Northern majority opinion thwarted the post-war reunion of North and South.
 

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Contents

The Case Reopened
3
A Democratic Society Emerges from Total War
15
The State of Parties 1865
42
Reconstruction as Construed from the Proclamations
48
The Democrats and Reconstruction
61
Andrew Johnson Outsider
85
Reconstruction as a Problem in Constitutional Theory
93
Conquered Provinces
99
l866 AND AFTER
253
His Own
260
Johnsons Break with the Party
274
Rights Bill
298
The Fourteenth Amendment
326
Campaign Preparations
364
Johnson and the Election Campaign of 1866
421
Military Reconstruction 1867
448

Reconstruction as a Problem in Policy
120
Johnsons Emergence from Military Governor to President
134
in The Executive Pardoning Policy
142
Peace for the South
153
in Early Reconstruction as Seen in the Unionist North
186
Peacemaking
214
Why Impeachment?
486
JulyDecember 1867
494
Selected Bibliography with Notes
511
Acknowledgments
523
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About the author (1988)

Eric L. McKitrick is at Columbia University.

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