Distribution and Development: A New Look at the Developing World

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MIT Press, 2002 - Business & Economics - 270 pages
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Most of the world's people live in "developing" economies, as do most of the world's poor. The predominant means of economic development is economic growth. In this book Gary Fields asks to what extent and in what circumstances economic growth improves the material standard of living of a country's people. Most development economists agree that economic growth raises the incomes of people in all parts of the income distribution and lowers the poverty rate. At the same time, some groups lose out because of changes accompanying economic growth. Fields examines these beliefs, asking what variables should be measured to determine whether progress is being made and what policies and circumstances cause some countries to do better than others. He also shows how the same data can be interpreted to reach different, even conflicting, conclusions. Using both theoretical and empirical approaches, Fields defines and examines inequality, poverty, income mobility, and economic well-being. Finally, he considers various policies for broad-based growth.Copublished with the Russell Sage Foundation.

 

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Contents

The Distributional Effects of Economic Growth
1
12 The Major Approaches to Distributional Analysis
3
13 Income Distribution as a Multifaceted Concept
7
14 Some Important Methodological Preliminaries The Role of Theory
8
15 Plan for the Volume
11
The Meaning and Measurement of Income Inequality
13
21 The Meaning of Inequality
14
22 Lorenz Curves and Lorenz Curve Comparisons
18
62 The Different Mobility Concepts in Certain Stylized Examples
126
63 Mobility Measures and Axioms Some Mobility Measures
130
64 Conclusions
137
Growth and Income Mobility Some Initial Evidence for the Developing World
139
72 Malaysia
145
73 Chile
147
74 China
149
75 Cote dlvoire
154

23 Lorenz Curves and Inequality Comparisons
23
24 A Note on Dominance Analysis in Theory and Practice
24
25 Inequality Measures and Lorenz Comparisons
28
26 About the Gini Coefficient
32
27 Summary
33
Economic Growth and Inequality A Review of the Empirical Evidence
35
32 Influences on Inequality
65
33 Conclusions
69
The Measurement of Poverty
73
42 Setting a Poverty Line
74
43 The Concept of Poverty
76
44 Four Groups of Poverty Measures
82
45 Poverty Dominance
86
46 The Concept of Relative Poverty
91
47 Summary
94
Does Economic Growth Reduce Absolute Poverty? A Review of the Empirical Evidence
95
51 Inferences from CrossSection Evidence
96
52 Intertemporal Evidence
98
Individual Country Experiences
102
54 Conclusion
104
The Meaning and Measurement of Income Mobility
105
61 Five Mobility Concepts
106
76 India
155
77 Conclusion
156
The Meaning and Measurement of Economic WellBeing
159
82 Social Welfare Functions Based on Vectors of Utilities or Incomes
161
83 Abbreviated Social Welfare Functions
165
84 Welfare Dominance Results
167
85 Similarities and Differences among the Various Approaches
170
86 Conclusions
172
Empirical Comparisons of Economic WellBeing
173
92 The Case of Taiwan
174
93 The Case of Thailand
178
94 The Case of Indonesia
181
95 The Case of Brazil
182
96 The Case of Chile
185
97 Conclusions
187
Distribution and Development Policies for BroadBased Growth
191
102 Stimulating Economic Growth
192
103 Distributional Policies Increasing Earnings in the Labor Market
204
104 Conclusions
222
References
225
Index
253
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About the author (2002)

Gary S. Fields is Professor of Labor Economics and Economics in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University.

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