Fireside Politics: Radio and Political Culture in the United States, 1920-1940

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JHU Press, May 1, 2003 - History - 384 pages
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In Fireside Politics, Douglas B. Craig provides the first detailed and complete examination of radio's changing role in American political culture between 1920 and 1940—the medium's golden age, when it commanded huge national audiences without competition from television. Craig follows the evolution of radio into a commercialized, networked, and regulated industry, and ultimately into an essential tool for winning political campaigns and shaping American identity in the interwar period. Finally, he draws thoughtful comparisons of the American experience of radio broadcasting and political culture with those of Australia, Britain, and Canada.

-- Stephen Ponder
 

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Contents

Abbreviations
27
Rates of Growth of Selected Consumer Goods and 16
1828
Radio Advertising and Networks
1830
Advertising Expenditures by Medium 19281939 26
1838
Affiliated Stations and Total Stations 19271940 34
1845
Regulatory Models and the Radio Act of1927
1847
Radio Listening by Sex 1936 Winter Audiences 244
1852
Bridle Shy 50
1861
Network Political Campaign Broadcasts 1932 153
The Champ 155
Radio Politics and Campaigning
A Tragedy of the Radio 169
Radio and Amusement Guide Ratings of Presidential 173
radios impact upon the ways in which they debated and formed
Radio Audiences and Voters
Just a minute dearie until I shut off Herbert 196

The Federal Radio Commission 19271934
1869
Distribution of Radio Resources by Zone 1927 66
1875
A New Deal for Radio ? The Communications Act of 1934
1887
The Federal Communications Commission and Radio 1934
1901
Radio and the Business of Politics 19201940
1920
Whos Elected? 120
1926
NBC Billings by Party 1936 Campaign 136
1940
National Parties Candidates and Radio
Radio and Citizenship 19201940
Figures
Broadcasting and the Limits
Radio Households and Set Production 19221940 11
Radio and the Politics of Good Taste
Conclusion
Bibliography
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Douglas B. Craig is a reader in history at the Australian National University. He is the author of After Wilson: The Struggle for the Democratic Party, 1920–1934.

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