Institutes of the Christian Religion

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Lulu.com, Mar 14, 2016 - Religion - 652 pages
23 Reviews
The chief work of the theologian John Calvin, the institutes have set the theological framework of Calvinists and Reform thinkers for many hundreds of years. Although originally written in the 16th century, Calvins work still holds many truths that we can learn from today
 

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Review: Institutes of the Christian Religion

User Review  - jWake - Christianbook.com

An awesome collection of books that every christian should read. Read full review

Review: Institutes of the Christian Religion

User Review  - Vlad K - Christianbook.com

As a Christian we all should have John Calvin's Institutes in our library, or at least have read through it at least once. This thought provoking book makes you go back into scripture and helps ... Read full review

Contents

PREFATORY ADDRESS
4
THE EPISTLE TO THE READER
12
SUBJECT OF THE PRESENT WORK
13
EPISTLE TO THE READER
14
METHOD AND ARRANGEMENT OR SUBJECT OF THE WHOLE WORK
15
INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION
17
CHAPTER XIV
72
CHAPTER XV
82
CHAPTER XI
317
CHAPTER XII
329
CHAPTER XIII
333
CHAPTER XIV
336
CHAPTER XV
345
CHAPTER XVI
349
CHAPTER XVII
352
CHAPTER XVIII
360

CHAPTER XVI
88
CHAPTER XVII
94
CHAPTER XVIII
102
BOOK SECOND
106
CHAPTER II
112
CHAPTER III
126
CHAPTER IV
135
CHAPTER V
139
CHAPTER VI
149
CHAPTER VII
153
CHAPTER VIII
161
CHAPTER IX
186
CHAPTER X
189
CHAPTER XI
199
CHAPTER XII
206
211 CHAPTER XIV
214
CHAPTER XV
219
CHAPTER XVI
223
CHAPTER XVII
233
BOOK THIRD
236
CHAPTER II
239
CHAPTER III
260
CHAPTER IV
272
CHAPTER V
291
CHAPTER VI
297
CHAPTER VII
300
CHAPTER VIII
306
CHAPTER IX
311
CHAPTER X
314
CHAPTER XIX
366
CHAPTER XX
373
CHAPTER XXI
403
CHAPTER XXII
408
CHAPTER XXIII
415
CHAPTER XXIV
423
CHAPTER XXV
433
BOOK FOURTH
442
CHAPTER II
455
CHAPTER III
461
CHAPTER IV
468
CHAPTER V
474
CHAPTER VI
482
CHAPTER VII
489
CHAPTER VIII
502
CHAPTER IX
509
CHAPTER X
515
CHAPTER XI
528
CHAPTER XII
536
CHAPTER XIII
546
CHAPTER XIV
556
CHAPTER XV
567
CHAPTER XVI
575
CHAPTER XVII
589
CHAPTER XVIII
615
CHAPTER XIX
623
CHAPTER XX
637
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About the author (2016)

Born Jean Cauvin in Noyon, Picardy, France, John Calvin was only a boy when Martin Luther first raised his challenge concerning indulgences. Calvin was enrolled at the age of 14 at the University of Paris, where he received preliminary training in theology and became an elegant Latinist. However, following the dictates of his father, he left Paris at the age of 19 and went to study law, first at Orleans, then at Bourges, in both of which centers the ideas of Luther were already creating a stir. On his father's death, Calvin returned to Paris, began to study Greek, the language of the New Testament, and decided to devote his life to scholarship. In 1532 he published a commentary on Seneca's De Clementia, but the following year, after experiencing what was considered a sudden conversion, he was forced to flee Paris for his religious views. The next year was given to the study of Hebrew in Basel and to writing the first version of his famous Institutes of the Christian Religion, which he gave to the printer in 1535. The rest of his life-except for a forced exile of three years-he spent in Geneva, where he became chief pastor, without ever being ordained. When he died, the city was solidly on his side, having almost become what one critic called a "theocracy." By then the fourth and much-revised edition of his Institutes had been published in Latin and French, commentaries had appeared on almost the whole Bible, treatises had been written on the Lord's Supper, on the Anabaptists, and on secret Protestants under persecution in France. Thousands of refugees had come to Geneva, and the city-energized by religious fervor-had found room and work for them. Though Calvin was sometimes bitter in his denunciation of those who disagreed with him, intolerant of other points of view, and absolutely sure he was right on the matter of predestination, he was nonetheless one of the great expounders of the faith. From his work the Reformed tradition had its genesis, and from his genius continues to refresh itself.

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