Strained Sisterhood: Gender and Class in the Boston Female Anti-slavery Society (Google eBook)

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Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1993 - Social Science - 231 pages
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Explores the origins of the feminist equality-versus-difference debate by examining the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, which disbanded in 1840 over this very issue. Hansen concludes that many of the issues that estranged abolitionists in antebellum Boston continue to divide women today.
  

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Strained sisterhood: gender and class in the Boston female anti-slavery society

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In this work, Hansen demonstrates that many of the class, religious, and sociocultural differences that limit female solidarity today were evident more than a century ago. Antebellum Boston is the ... Read full review

Contents

The Boston Female AntiSlavery Society A Brief History
13
Boston in 1835
29
Women of Antebellum Boston
43
Women in the Boston Female AntiSlavery Society
64
Divisions in the Boston Female AntiSlavery Society
93
The Boston Female AntiSlavery Society Fair
124
Models of Womanhood within the Boston Female AntiSlavery Society
140
Conclusion
157
Notes
165
Bibliography
201
Index
221
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About the author (1993)

Debra Gold Hansen has taught for San Jose State University's School of Library and Information Science since 1989. She has an MLIS from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Irvine. Her writings on California libraries and library and information science education have appeared in professional and historical publications.

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