Observing Handbook and Catalogue of Deep-Sky Objects

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 17, 1998 - Nature - 352 pages
A detailed and comprehensive guide to observing the deep sky, this is the most detailed guide available in a single volume. Information and descriptions for more than 2000 galaxies, nebulae and star clusters was meticulously researched and checked for this book, removing the common transcription errors in other catalogues. The objects range from those visible in binoculars to faint galaxies requiring a 30 cm telescope, and most descriptions are given for a range of telescope apertures. An essential reference for telescope users.
 

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The "Observing Handbook and Catalogue of Deep-Sky Objects" is an extremely well organized compendium of useful data. Concise, bloat-free and to the point, the information is easy to read and void of useless drivel or editorial content. Organized by constellation, it makes finding and identification of targets easy by describing whether or not an instrument is up to the task, and exactly what to expect at the eyepiece through 6, 10 and 12 inch telescopes.
With this reference work, the average amateur with an average scope does not have to sift through a slew of targets he can't view. It's small footprint makes it an ideal reference for field work, specially if one travels to observe. Out of the sky's 88 constellations, 68 of them north of the -50 declination are included in this work, covering over 2050 objects. Caveat: It doesn't cover the whole southern sky, so people "down under" will only have limited use for it.
This work has allowed me to find and positively identify more targets than anything else out there. Both manually and with a Go-To scope, it's a tool I no longer go without. While using a well aligned Go-To system, this book has allowed me to actually observe unbelievably long lists of targets in a single night. I firmly believe it to be astronomy's best kept secret. A most potent tool to aid amateur observers find and identify more targets in less time. I believe anyone without it is missing out on a seriously helpful, publication.
I highly recommend it.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Amateur observing
1
Eyepieces
2
Finderscopes and finding
3
Gadgets
4
Lighting and the recording of notes
6
Observing locations
8
Observing sites for the survey
9
Deepsky data sources
10
Gemini
121
Grus
124
Hercules
125
Horologium
128
Hydra
129
Lacerta
135
Leo
137
Leo Minor
150

Open clusters
12
Galactic nebulae
13
Observations
14
Abbreviations
15
Andromeda
16
Antlia
21
Aquarius
25
Aquila
28
Ara
31
Aries
32
Auriga
33
Bootes
37
Camelopardalis
40
Cancer
44
Canes Venatici
46
Canis Major
55
Canis Minor
60
Capricornus
61
Cassiopeia
62
Centaurus
68
Cepheus
69
Cetus
72
Columba
77
Coma Berenices
78
Corona Australis
91
Corona Borealis
92
Corvus
93
Crater
95
Cygnus
97
Delphinus
103
Draco
105
Equuleus
109
Eridanus
110
Fornax
116
Lepus
153
Libra
155
Lupus
158
Lynx
159
Lyra
164
Microscopium
166
Monoceros
167
Ophiuchus
172
Orion
176
Pegasus
181
Perseus
188
Phoenix
196
Pisces
197
Pisces Austrinus
200
Puppis
201
Pyxis
207
Sagitta
208
Sagittarius
209
Scorpius
216
Sculptor
221
Scutum
224
Serpens
228
Sextans
231
Taurus
233
Triangulum
236
Ursa Major
241
Ursa Minor
255
Vela
256
Virgo
257
Vulpecula
282
Notes on references for deepsky observers
285
Catalogue
288
Appendix of double stars
348
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