Memoirs of the reign of George III. to the session of Parliament ending A.D. 1793, Volume 1

Front Cover
Printed for J. Milliken, 1796 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 423 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Page 425 - ... unsullied sanctity of their lawn ; upon the learned judges to interpose the purity of their ermine to save us from this pollution. I call upon the honour of your lordships to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country to vindicate the national character. I invoke the genius of the constitution.
Page 423 - Your efforts are for ever vain and impotent — doubly so from this mercenary aid on which you rely, for it irritates to an incurable resentment the minds of your enemies — to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder; devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling...
Page 422 - I CANNOT, my lords, I WILL NOT join in congratulation on misfortune and disgrace. This, my lords, is a perilous and tremendous moment : it is not a time for adulation : the smoothness of flattery cannot save us in this rugged and awful crisis. It is now necessary to instruct the throne, in the language of TRUTH.
Page 97 - Rather let prudence and temper come first from this side. I will undertake for America that she will follow the example.
Page 6 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Page 93 - Taxation is no part of the governing or legislative power. The taxes are a voluntary gift and grant of the Commons alone.
Page 172 - My lords, I thought the slavish doctrine of passive obedience had long since been exploded; and. when our kings were obliged to confess that their title to the crown, and the rule of their government, had no other foundation than the known laws of the land, I never expected to hear a divine right, or a divine infallibility, attributed to any other branch of the legislature.
Page 93 - It is my opinion that this kingdom has no right to lay a tax upon the colonies. At the same time, I assert the authority of this kingdom over the colonies to be sovereign and supreme, in every circumstance of government and legislation whatsoever.
Page 96 - I will be bold to affirm that the profits to Great Britain from the trade of the colonies, through all its branches, is two millions a year. This is the fund that carried you triumphantly through the last war. The estates that were rented at two thousand pounds a year, threescore years ago, are at three thousand at present. Those estates sold then from fifteen to eighteen years' purchase : the same may now be sold for thirty.

Bibliographic information