Empire at the Margins: Culture, Ethnicity, and Frontier in Early Modern China

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Pamela Kyle Crossley, Helen F. Siu, Professor of Anthropology Helen F Siu, Donald S. Sutton, Professor of History and Anthropology Donald S Sutton
University of California Press, Jan 19, 2006 - History - 378 pages
Focusing on the Ming (1368-1644) and (especially) the Qing (1364-1912) eras, this book analyzes crucial moments in the formation of cultural, regional, and religious identities. The contributors examine the role of the state in a variety of environments on China's "peripheries," paying attention to shifts in law, trade, social stratification, and cultural dialogue. They find that local communities were critical participants in the shaping of their own identities and consciousness as well as the character and behavior of the state. At certain times the state was institutionally definitive, but it could also be symbolic and contingent. They demonstrate how the imperial discourse is many-faceted, rather than a monolithic agent of cultural assimilation.
 

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Contents

Ethnicity in the Qing Eight Banners
27
Making Mongols
58
On Islam and Muslims in Qing
83
The Qing and Islam on the Western Frontier
113
Tusi Offices and Chinas Political Incorporation
135
The Yao Wars in the MidMing and their Impact on Yao Ethnicity
171
Ethnicity and the Miao Frontier in the Eighteenth Century
190
The Hainan
229
The Case of She Bandits
255
Ethnicity in the Pearl River Delta
285
Conclusion
311
notes on contributors 321 bibliography
325
glossary of characters
347
index
367
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About the author (2006)

Pamela Kyle Crossley is Professor of History at Dartmouth College. Helen Siu is Professor of Anthropology at Yale University. Donald Sutton is Professor of History and Anthropology at Carnegie Mellon University.

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