Kalila and Dimna: Or, The Fables of Bidpai

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W. Baxter for J. Parker, 1819 - Fables, English - 366 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
32
III
47
IV
65
V
82
VI
160
VII
192
VIII
216
X
268
XI
273
XII
286
XIII
298
XIV
314
XV
339
XVI
343
XVII
346

IX
258
XVIII
354

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Page 270 - a hundred black cattle, in the proportion of a bull or a cow for every four goats. I will then . purchase land, and hire workmen to plough it with the beasts, and put it into tillage, so that before five years are over I shall, no doubt, have realized a great fortune by the sale of the milk which the cows will give, and of the produce of my land. My next business will be to build a magnificent house, and engage a number of servants, both...
Page 266 - Bring him to me a second time,' said the lion, 'and I promise you he shall not escape again.' So the jackal went to the ass and said, 'What was the reason of your sudden fright? A she ass, owing to the violence of her passion, gave you, to be sure, rather rude demonstrations of her affection, but you have only to remain quiet and undismayed and she will become gentle and submissive.' As soon as the ass heard her name mentioned his desire became uncontrollable, and he brayed through impatience and...
Page 271 - I shall, no doubt, have realized a great fortune by the sale of the milk which the cows will give, and of the produce of my land. My next business will be to build a magnificent house, and engage a number of servants, both male and female; and, when my establishment is completed, I will marry the handsomest woman I can find, who, in due time becoming a mother, will present me with an heir to my possessions, who, as he advances in age, shall receive the best masters that can be procured; and, if the...
Page 270 - ... the story of the Brahman and the pot of rice runs as follows : ' A religious man was in the habit of receiving every day from the house of a merchant a certain quantity of butter (oil) and honey, of which, having eaten as much as he wanted, he put the rest into a jar, which he hung on a nail in a corner of the room, hoping that the jar would in time be filled. Now, as he was leaning back one day on his couch, with a stick in his hand, and the jar suspended over his head, he thought of the high...
Page 266 - As soon as the ass heard her name mentioned his desire became uncontrollable, and he brayed through impatience and suffered himself to be conducted again to the lion; and the jackal preceded him as before and told the lion where he was, and cautioned him to be well upon his guard, for that if he escaped a second time he would never return. The eagerness of the lion not to be disappointed a second time of his prey was very great, and he went to the spot where the ass was, and no sooner saw him than,...
Page 262 - ... ties of affinity or friendship, by attending closely to everything that passes without them; for a wink of the eye, an expression which falls from the tongue, and even the motions of the body, are all evidences of what is going on in the heart; and wise men have laid it down as a rule that when anyone doubts the sincerity of his friend, he should, by unremittingly observing every part of his conduct, guard against the possibility of being deceived by him; for if his suspicions are founded, he...
Page 263 - Your observation," answered the tortoise, "is just, but the physician has declared that nothing will cure her except the heart of a monkey." Then the monkey reasoned with himself thus: "Fool that I am! Immoderate desires, which are not suited to my age, threaten me with destruction, and I now discover too late how true it is that the contented man passes his life in peace and security, while the covetous and ambitious live in trouble and difficulty; and I have occasion at this moment for all the...
Page 265 - ... which the ass accounted for by saying that his master gave him scarcely anything to eat. Jackal: 'Why do you remain any longer with him and submit to this treatment?' Ass: 'What can I do or whither can I go? Wherever I am, it is my fate to be ill used and starved.' Jackal: 'If you will follow me I will conduct you to a place uninhabited by men, who you say are your foes, and abounding in food, and where you will find a female ass whose equal in beauty and fatness was never seen and who is desirous...
Page 17 - I am the slave of what I have spoken, but the master of what I conceal.' The king of Greece: 'I have never regretted the silence which I had imposed upon myself; though I have often repented of the words I have uttered; 1 for silence is attended with advantage, whereas loquacity is often followed by incurable evils.
Page 150 - ... them and endeavoured to convince them of their error. This scene attracted the attention of a man who was passing by who told the bird that it was wasting both time and patience, and that no one thought of proving a sword upon a stubborn, impenetrable stone, or of making a bow out of a piece of wood that would not bend. The bird, however, without attending to him, flew...

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