The Cultivation and Use of Imagination

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E. Arnold, 1893 - Imagination - 96 pages
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Page 75 - Lowe insisted on his point over and over again : " The test of science is prevision or prediction, and Adam Smith appears to me in the main to satisfy that condition." " I think that Adam Smith is entitled to the unique merit among all men who ever lived in this world of having founded a deductive and demonstrative science of human actions and conduct.
Page 17 - I am sure, you would all appreciate — of mental change of scene. I do not only want you to know dry facts ; I am not only looking to a knowledge of facts, nor chiefly to that knowledge. I want the heart to be stirred as well as the intellect. I want you to feel more and live more than you can do if you only know what surrounds yourselves. I want the action of the imagination, the sympathetic study of history and travels, the broad teaching of the poets, and, indeed, of the best writers of other...
Page 76 - Wealth of Nations" is in many parts obsolete, and in all, imperfect. Political Economy, properly so called, has grown up almost from infancy since the time of Adam Smith : and the philosophy of society, from which practically that eminent thinker never separated his more peculiar theme, though still in a very early stage of its progress, has advanced many steps beyond...
Page 16 - Then, again, take geography, travels in foreign countries. Here, again, you have matters which are absent, in the physical sense, from you ; but the study of travels will enable you to realize things that are absent to your own minds. And as for the power of forming ideal pictures, there I refer you to poets, dramatists, and imaginative writers, to the great literature of all times and of all countries. Such studies as these...
Page 79 - ... and its relative justification. Similarly, it is beginning to appear that no great conception, no great body of doctrines which really influenced society for a long period, was without a certain truth and value, having regard to contemporary circumstances. (6) Modern economic theories, therefore, are not universally true ; they are true neither for the past, when the conditions they postulate did not exist, nor for the future, when, unless society becomes stationary, the conditions will have...
Page 83 - It would have been difficult for him to say anything new on a subject with which so many distinguished thinkers have dealt ; but the ideas he set forth about science and the imagination were sound and well expressed. Referring to the work of Sir William Thomson, he said: "When I think of your fellow-countryman, Sir William Thomson, engaged on atoms and molecules, piercing the secrets of the smallest entities, brooding over the mystic dance of ethereal vortices, while his magic wand summons elemental...
Page 73 - I do not mean to say," he declared, " that Adam Smith had not a great command and a very great knowledge of history, of law, of philosophy, and of almost everything that can make an accomplished writer ; but he had, in addition to these, this peculiar quality — that he had the sagacity to enter into the minds of mankind ; and in dealing with the subjects with which he dealt, he had the faculty of anticipating and foreseeing what they would do under certain circumstances ; and this has given him...
Page 78 - They may be thus stated — (1) Political Economy is not a body of absolutely true doctrines, revealed to the world at the end of the last and the beginning of the present century, but a number of more or less valuable theories and generalizations. (2) No age, since men began to speculate, has been without its economic ideas. Political Economy was not born fully armed from the brain of Adam Smith or any other thinker : its appearance as an independent science meant only the disentanglement of economic...
Page 76 - It appears to the present writer, that a work similar in its object and general conception to that of Adam Smith, but adapted to the more extended knowledge and improved ideas of the present age, is the kind of contribution which Political Economy at present requires. The "Wealth of Nations" is in many parts obsolete, and in all, imperfect.
Page 17 - ... things that are absent to your own minds. And as for the power of forming ideal pictures, there I refer you to poets, dramatists, and imaginative writers, to the great literature of all times and of all countries. Such studies as these will enable you to live, and to move, and to think, in a world different from the narrow world by which you are surrounded. These studies will open up to you sources of amusement which, I think I may say, will often rise into happiness. I wish you, by the aid of...

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