State and Rural Society in Medieval Islam: Sultans, Muqtaʻs, and Fallahun

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BRILL, Jan 1, 1997 - History - 337 pages
This book deals with the evolution of Islamic state and society from the 10th to the 14th centuries, focusing on the history of the Arab society under the "iq '" (allocated tax revenue) system. The book offers a well documented study of the system with its use of hitherto unpublished Arabic manuscripts. The introductory chapter deals with the historical origins of the "iq '" system, while chapters that follow discuss the history of the system in Iraq, Syria and Egypt, including systematic studies on the rural life and peasantry in Egypt. "State and Rural Society in Medieval Islam" is the first thorough, book-length study to show how this system may explain various historical phenomena in medieval Islam. The "iq '" system now can be seen as a system with a comprehensive life of its own.
 

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Contents

The IqtāSystem in Iraq under the Buwayhids
18
The IqtāSystem in Egypt and Syria
42
IqtāPolicy of Sultan Baybars I
77
A Memorandum to Amir Kitbughā
105
An Analysis
124
The Revolt of the Nusayri Peasants in Jabala
162
Egyptian Rural Society under the IqtāSystem
177
Conclusion
234
Glossary
240
Bibliography
260
Maps
312
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Tsugitaka Sato, Litt.D. in History, the University of Tokyo, is Professor of History at the University of Tokyo. He has published extensively on social and economic history in medieval Islam including "Islamic Urbanism in Human History: Political Power and Social Networks" ("Kegan Paul International Ltd.," 1996).

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