Codes: The Guide to Secrecy From Ancient to Modern Times

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CRC Press, May 24, 2005 - Computers - 704 pages
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From the Rosetta Stone to public-key cryptography, the art and science of cryptology has been used to unlock the vivid history of ancient cultures, to turn the tide of warfare, and to thwart potential hackers from attacking computer systems. Codes: The Guide to Secrecy from Ancient to Modern Times explores the depth and breadth of the field, remaining accessible to the uninitiated while retaining enough rigor for the seasoned cryptologist.

The book begins by tracing the development of cryptology from that of an arcane practice used, for example, to conceal alchemic recipes, to the modern scientific method that is studied and employed today. The remainder of the book explores the modern aspects and applications of cryptography, covering symmetric- and public-key cryptography, cryptographic protocols, key management, message authentication, e-mail and Internet security, and advanced applications such as wireless security, smart cards, biometrics, and quantum cryptography. The author also includes non-cryptographic security issues and a chapter devoted to information theory and coding. Nearly 200 diagrams, examples, figures, and tables along with abundant references and exercises complement the discussion.

Written by leading authority and best-selling author on the subject Richard A. Mollin, Codes: The Guide to Secrecy from Ancient to Modern Times is the essential reference for anyone interested in this exciting and fascinating field, from novice to veteran practitioner.

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Contents

From the Riddles of Ancient Egypt to Cryptography in the Renaissance 3500 Years in the Making
1
From SixteenthCentury Cryptography to the New Millennium The Last 500 Years
59
SymmetricKey Cryptography
107
PublicKey Cryptography
161
Cryptographic Protocols
191
Key Management
233
Message Authentication
251
Electronic Mail and Internet Security
271
Mathematical Facts
466
Pseudorandom Number Generation
506
Factoring Large Integers
509
Technical and Advanced Details
527
Probability Theory
543
Recognizing Primes
550
Exercises
561
Bibliography
605

Applications and the Future
329
Noncryptographic Security Issues
375
Information Theory and Coding
425
List of Symbols
627
Index
629
Copyright

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