Understanding by Design

Front Cover
ASCD, Jan 1, 2005 - Education - 370 pages
73 Reviews
What is understanding and how does it differ from knowledge? How can we determine the big ideas worth understanding? Why is understanding an important teaching goal, and how do we know when students have attained it? How can we create a rigorous and engaging curriculum that focuses on understanding and leads to improved student performance in today's high-stakes, standards-based environment?

Authors Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe answer these and many other questions in this second edition of Understanding by Design. Drawing on feedback from thousands of educators around the world who have used the UbD framework since its introduction in 1998, the authors have greatly revised and expanded their original work to guide educators across the K-16 spectrum in the design of curriculum, assessment, and instruction. With an improved UbD Template at its core, the book explains the rationale of backward design and explores in greater depth the meaning of such key ideas as essential questions and transfer tasks. Readers will learn why the familiar coverage- and activity-based approaches to curriculum design fall short, and how a focus on the six facets of understanding can enrich student learning. With an expanded array of practical strategies, tools, and examples from all subject areas, the book demonstrates how the research-based principles of Understanding by Design apply to district frameworks as well as to individual units of curriculum.

Combining provocative ideas, thoughtful analysis, and tested approaches, this new edition of Understanding by Design offers teacher-designers a clear path to the creation of curriculum that ensures better learning and a more stimulating experience for students and teachers alike.

  

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Review: Understanding by Design

User Review  - Taryn Chase - Goodreads

While this seminal instructional design tome is targeted to K-12 teachers, I read this book for a workshop with coworkers on designing digital textbooks. The backward design concept is strong, but I ... Read full review

Review: Understanding by Design

User Review  - Mac - Goodreads

This book is tough to get through but a must read for anybody who wants to be a leader of teachers. The concepts involved in backward design can be used for everything from unit planning to curriculum ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Backward Design
13
Understanding Understanding
35
Gaining Clarity on Our Goals
56
The Six Facets of Understanding
82
Doorways to Understanding
105
Crafting Understandings
126
Thinking like an Assessor
146
The Design Process
254
UbD as Curriculum Framework
275
Yes but
302
Getting Started
322
Sample 6Page Template
327
Endnotes
333
Glossary
336
Bibliography
355

Criteria and Validity
172
Planning for Learning
191
Teaching for Understanding
227
Index
365
About the Authors
369
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

GRANT P. WIGGINS is the president and director of programs for the Center on Learning, Assessment, and School Structure (CLASS), a nonprofit educational research and consulting organization in Pennington, New Jersey.

Jay McTighe brings a wealth of experience developed during a rich and varied career in education. He served as director of the Maryland Assessment Consortium, a state collaboration of school districts working together to develop and share formative performance assessments. Prior to this position, Jay was involved with school improvement projects at the Maryland State Department of Education where he directed the development of the Instructional Framework, a multimedia database on teaching. Jay is well known for his work with thinking skills, having coordinated statewide efforts to develop instructional strategies, curriculum models, and assessment procedures for improving the quality of student thinking. In addition to his work at the state level, Jay has experience at the district level in Prince George's County, Maryland, as a classroom teacher, resource specialist, and program coordinator. He also directed a state residential enrichment program for gifted and talented students.

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