The Lady's magazine: or, Entertaining companion for the fair sex

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Page 247 - For what the eternal MAKER has ordain'd The pow'rs of man: we feel within ourselves His energy divine ; he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb , Of life and being ; to be great like Him, Beneficent and active.
Page 597 - And what is friendship but a name, A charm that lulls to sleep; A shade that follows wealth or fame, But leaves the wretch to weep?
Page 318 - Spain the most sacred compacts — has arrested her monarchs — obliged them to a forced and manifestly void abdication and renunciation ; has behaved with the same violence towards the Spanish Nobles whom he keeps in his power — has declared that he will elect a king of Spain, the most horrible attempt that is recorded in history— has sent his troops into Spain, seized her fortresses and her Capital, and scattered his troops throughout the country— has committed against Spain all sorts of...
Page 202 - For he who fights and runs away May live to fight another day ; But he who is in battle slain Can never rise and fight again.
Page 188 - Handel came to pay his respects to Lord Kinnoul, with whom he was particularly acquainted. His Lordship, as was natural, paid him some compliments on the noble entertainment which he had lately given the town. ' My Lord,' said Handel, ' I should be sorry if I only entertained them ; I wish to make them better.
Page 283 - Deny'd his wonted succour; nor with more Regret beheld her drooping, than the bells Of lilies; fairest lilies, not so fair ! Queen lilies! and ye painted populace ! Who dwell in fields, and lead ambrosial lives...
Page 188 - Omnipotent reigneth,' they were so transported, that they all, together with the King, (who happened to be present,) started up, and remained standing till the chorus ended : And hence it became the fashion in England for the audience to stand while that part of the music is performing. Some days after the...
Page 172 - Up to the tavern-door we post; Of Alice and her grief I told; And I gave money to the host, To buy a new cloak for the old. 'And let it be of duffil grey, As warm a cloak as man can sell...
Page 167 - In the commonwealths of Athens and Rome, the modest simplicity of private houses announced the equal condition of freedom ; whilst the sovereignty of the people was represented in the majestic edifices destined to the public use : nor was this republican spirit totally extinguished by the introduction of wealth and monarchy.
Page 119 - If he that in the field is slain Be in the bed of honour lain, He that is beaten may be said To lie in honour's truckle-bed. For as we see th...

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