"Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character

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The outrageous exploits of one of this century's greatest scientific minds and a legendary American original. In this phenomenal national bestseller, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P. Feynman recounts in his inimitable voice his adventures trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek, painting a naked female toreador, accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums and much else of an eyebrow-raising and hilarious nature.

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User Review  - lanewillson - LibraryThing

When I conjure a Nobel Laureate in physics in my mind’s eye, some very definite attributes emerge. I think of a man, yes, a man, because my inner Papaw is stuck in 1915. I think of someone who worked ... Read full review

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User Review  - EricCostello - LibraryThing

Not quite an autobiography, more a series of anecdotal snapshots and musings. The man to whom Feynman spoke had hoped this would not be the only memoirs we'd get out of Feynman, but alas! It appears ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Richard Feynman was, until his death in 1988, the most famous physicist in the world. Only an infinitesimal part of the general population could understand his mathematical physics, but his outgoing and sunny personality, his gift for exposition, his habit of playing the bongo drums, and his testimony to the Presidential Commission on the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster turned him into a celebrity.

Richard Feynman died in 1988 after a long illness. Freeman Dyson, of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, called him 'the most original mind of his generation', while in its obituary The New York Times described him as 'arguably the most brilliant, iconoclastic and influential of the postwar generation of theoretical physicists'.

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