Indian Folk Tales: Being Side-lights on Village Life in Bilaspore, Central Provinces

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E. Stock, 1908 - Bilaspur (India : District) - 99 pages
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Page 43 - Twixt the shadow and the sunshine, Herds of fallow deer were feeding, But they saw not Hiawatha; To his bow he whispered, "Fail not!" To his arrow whispered, "Swerve not!" Sent it singing on its errand, To the red heart of the roebuck; Threw the deer across his shoulder, And sped forward without pausing. At the doorway of his wigwam Sat the ancient Arrow-maker, In the land of the Dacotahs, Making arrow-heads of jasper, Arrow-heads of chalcedony.
Page 99 - O'EE the gloomy hills of darkness, Look, my soul, be still, and gaze; All the promises do travail With a glorious day of grace; Blessed jubilee! Let thy glorious morning dawn.
Page 99 - Kingdoms wide that sit in darkness, — Grant them, Lord ! the glorious light , And, from eastern coast to western, May the morning chase the night ; And redemption, Freely purchased, win the day. 3 Fly abroad, thou mighty gospel ! Win and conquer, never cease ; May thy lasting, wide dominions, Multiply and still increase ; Sway thy sceptre, Saviour ! all the world around.
Page 99 - Kingdoms wide that sit in darkness, Grant them, Lord, the glorious light ; And, from eastern coast to western, May the morning chase the night, And redemption, Freely purchas'd, win the day.
Page 99 - O'ER the gloomy hills of darkness, Cheered by no celestial ray, Sun of righteousness ! arising, Bring the bright, the glorious day ; Send the gospel To the earth's remotest bound. 2 Kingdoms wide that sit in darkness, — Grant them, Lord ! the glorious light , And, from eastern coast to western, May the morning chase the night ; And redemption, Freely purchased, win the day.
Page 43 - At the feet of Laughing Water Hiawatha laid his burden, Threw the red deer from his shoulders ; And the maiden looked up at him, Looked up from her mat of rushes, Said with gentle look and accent,
Page 56 - AA pashas, and the pashas began to imprison the taxgatherers, and the taxgatherers began to refund their squeezings to the peasants — just as the water began to quench the fire, and the fire began to burn the stick, and the stick began to beat the dog ; and it needed a column full of gossip in the...
Page 91 - These that have turned the world upside down have come hither also ;" alleging afterwards in his justification the marginal reference to " These men being Jews do exceedingly trouble our city.
Page 49 - Tarans) were supposed to wander in woods and solitudes, lamenting their hard fate, and were said to be often seen. In the North of England it is thought very unlucky to go over their graves. It is vulgarly called going over " unchristened ground." In the Gentle Shepherd, Bauldy, describing Mause as a witch, says of her — " At midnight hours o'er the Kirk-yard she raves, And howks unchristen'd Weans out of their Graves.
Page 56 - If I strike you once with my beak you will disappear : how then can you talk of eating me ? " But the louse broiled and ate his friend, the crow.

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