Alone: The Classic Polar Adventure

Front Cover
Island Press, Aug 8, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 314 pages
46 Reviews

When Admiral Richard E. Byrd set out on his second Antarctic expedition in 1934, he was already an international hero for having piloted the first flights over the North and South Poles. His plan for this latest adventure was to spend six months alone near the bottom of the world, gathering weather data and indulging his desire “to taste peace and quiet long enough to know how good they really are.” But early on things went terribly wrong. Isolated in the pervasive polar night with no hope of release until spring, Byrd began suffering inexplicable symptoms of mental and physical illness. By the time he discovered that carbon monoxide from a defective stovepipe was poisoning him, Byrd was already engaged in a monumental struggle to save his life and preserve his sanity.

When Alone was first published in 1938, it became an enormous bestseller. This edition keeps alive Byrd’s unforgettable narrative for new generations of readers.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
12
4 stars
22
3 stars
11
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: Alone: The Classic Polar Adventure

User Review  - Melinda Brasher - Goodreads

I found this intensely interesting, despite a few philosophy bits that dragged a bit and a little too much repetitive day-to-day detail in some areas. This polar explorer spent an Antarctic winter ... Read full review

Review: Alone: The Classic Polar Adventure

User Review  - Gabriel Millerd - Goodreads

Amazing authenticity; documentation of breaking down in solitude as well. Sadly he used "performance enhancing" nightly radio updates of stock prices and baseball scores. Read full review

All 23 reviews »

Contents

THE IDEA
3
THE DECISION
29
THE GOD OF 2 5 60
79
THE NIGHT
86
THE INTIMATION
119
DESPAIR
173
THE STRUGGLE
195
THE PROPOSAL
212
COLD
228
THE TRACTORS
249
THE SEARCHLIGHT
272
AFTERWORD by Kieran Mulvaney
297
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd (1888-1957) was an international hero best known for his accomplishments in pioneer aviation and polar exploration. Recipient of the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor for navigating the first flight over the North Pole in 1926, he also was honored for his 1927 trans-Atlantic flight. In subsequent expeditions to the South Pole he discovered new land and collected important scientific data. His books Little America and Skyward, both straightforward accounts of his polar expeditions, were followed by Alone in 1938. Byrd wrote Alone in response to requests from people all over the world wanting to know the true story behind his ordeal.

Bibliographic information