The Iliad of Homer, Volumes 1-2

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1898 - Achilles (Greek mythology)
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Contents

I
1
II
28
III
67
IV
87
V
111
VI
151
VII
174
VIII
196
XIV
38
XV
61
XVI
94
XVII
132
XVIII
164
XIX
191
XX
209
XXI
231

IX
220
X
251
XI
276
XII
312
XIII
1

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Page 171 - And eyeing with affright the horse-hair plume That grimly nodded from the lofty crest. At this both parents in their fondness laughed ; And hastily the mighty Hector took The helmet from his brow and laid it down...
Page 1 - O Goddess ! sing the wrath of Peleus' son, Achilles ; sing the deadly wrath that brought Woes numberless upon the Greeks, and swept To Hades many a valiant soul, and gave Their limbs a prey to dogs and birds of air, — For so had Jove appointed, — from the time When the two chiefs, Atrides, king of men, And great Achilles, parted first as foes.
Page 172 - Her forehead gently with his hand and said : — " Sorrow not thus, beloved one, for me. No living man can send me to the shades Before my time ; no man of woman born, Coward or brave, can shun his destiny.
Page 220 - So, high in hope, they sat the whole night through In warlike lines, and many watch-fires blazed, As when in heaven the stars look brightly forth Round the clear-shining moon, while not a breeze Stirs in the depths of air, and all the stars Are seen, and gladness fills the shepherd's heart, So many fires in sight of Ilium blazed, Lit by the sons of Troy, between the ships And eddying Xanthus : on the plain there shone A thousand ; fifty warriors by each fire Sat in its light. Their steeds beside...
Page 342 - Remorseless Mars Already had laid lifeless most of these, And Hector, whom I cherished most, whose arm Defended both our city and ourselves, Him didst thou lately slay while combating For his dear country. For his sake I come To the Greek fleet, and to redeem his corse I bring uncounted ransom. O, revere The gods, Achilles, and be merciful, Calling to mind thy father! happier he Than I ; for I have borne what no man else ~~~ .That dwells on earth could bear, — have laid my lips'" Upon the hand...
Page 6 - And then the hero-son of Atreus rose, Wide-ruling Agamemnon, greatly chafed. His gloomy heart was full of wrath, his eyes Sparkled like fire ; he fixed a menacing look Full on the augur Calchas, and began : — " Prophet of evil ! never hadst thou yet A cheerful word for me. To mark the signs Of coming mischief is thy great delight. Good dost thou ne'er foretell nor bring to pass. And now thou pratest, in thine auguries, Before the Greeks, how that the archer-god Afflicts us thus, because I would...
Page 185 - Were fashioned by the artist's passing skill, For here he placed the earth and heaven, and here The great deep and the never-resting sun And the full moon, and here he set the stars That shine in the round...
Page 171 - The day shall come in which our sacred Troy, And Priam, and the people over whom Spear-bearing Priam rules, shall perish all.
Page 169 - Andromache Pressed to his side meanwhile, and, all in tears, Clung to his hand, and, thus beginning, said: — "Too brave! thy valor yet will cause thy death. Thou hast no pity on thy tender child, Nor me, unhappy one, who soon must be Thy widow. All the Greeks will rush on thee To take thy life. A happier lot were mine, If I must lose thee, to go down to earth, For I shall have no hope when thou art gone — Nothing but sorrow. Father have I none, And no dear mother. Great Achilles slew My father...
Page 343 - The gods ordain The lot of man to suffer, while themselves Are free from care. Beside Jove's threshold stand Two casks of gifts for man. One cask contains The evil, one the good, and he to whom The Thunderer gives them mingled sometimes falls Into misfortune, and is sometimes crowned With blessings. But the man to whom he gives The evil only stands a mark exposed To wrong, and, chased by grim calamity, Wanders the teeming earth, alike unloved By gods and men.

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