An Introduction to the Universal Explanatory Reader: Designed for Junior Classes in Schools and Private Tuition...

Front Cover
G. and W. B. Whittaker, 1822 - Readers (Primary) - 232 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 47 - Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry all easy ; and he that riseth late must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night ; while laziness travels so slowly, that poverty soon overtakes him. Drive thy business, let not that drive thee ; and early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise...
Page 56 - ... the blessing of heaven; and therefore ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at present seem to want it, but comfort and help them. Remember Job suffered, and was afterwards prosperous. 'And now, to conclude, " experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other...
Page 46 - I stopped my horse lately where a great number of people were collected at an auction of merchants' goods. The hour of the sale not being come, they were conversing on the badness of the times; and one of the company called to a plain, clean old man, with white locks; — "Pray, Father Abraham, what think you of the times? Will not these heavy taxes quite ruin the country? How shall we ever be able to pay them? What would you advise us to?" Father Abraham stood up and replied, "If you would have...
Page 50 - A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost ; for want of a shoe the horse was lost ; and for want of a horse the rider was lost,' being overtaken and slain by the enemy ; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe nail.
Page 183 - Truth is always consistent with itself, and needs nothing to help it out ; it is always near at hand, and sits upon our lips and is ready to drop out before we are aware; whereas a lie is troublesome, and sets a man's invention upon the rack, and one trick needs a great many more to make it good.
Page 47 - So what signifies wishing and hoping for better times? We may make these times better, if we bestir ourselves. Industry need not wish, and He that lives upon hope will die fasting. There are no gains without pains; then Help, hands, for I have no lands; or, if I have, they are smartly taxed.
Page 48 - ... followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes. If we are industrious we shall never starve ; for, as Poor Richard says, At the working-man's house hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
Page 54 - We are offered, by the terms of this sale, six months' credit; and that perhaps has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it. But, ah, think what you do when you run in debt; you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him, you will make poor pitiful sneaking excuses, and by degrees come to lose your veracity, and sink...
Page 47 - He, that hath a trade, hath an estate; and he, that hath a calling, hath an office of profit and honour," as poor Richard says: but then the trade must be worked at, and the calling well followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes. If we are industrious, we shall never starve: for, " at the working man's house, hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
Page 48 - The cat in gloves catches no mice! as Poor Richard says. 'Tis true there is much to be done, and perhaps you are weak-handed; but stick to it steadily, and you will see great effects; for Constant dropping wears away stones; and By diligence and patience the mouse ate in two the cable; and Little strokes fell great oaks...

Bibliographic information