A Manual of Greek Literature: From the Earliest Authentic Periods to the Close of the Byzantine Era

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Harper, 1853 - Greek literature - 580 pages
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Page 2 - Iran then, a country bounded on the north by the Caspian, on the south by the Indian Ocean, on the east by the Indus, and on the west by the Euphrates, is the spot to which all the languages of the civilized world, ancient and modern, now unite in pointing as the place of their origin.
Page 353 - The art of medicine is thus divided amongst them : each physician applies himself to one disease only, and not more. All places abound in physicians ; some physicians are for the eyes, others for the head, others for the teeth, others for the parts about the belly, and others for internal disorders.
Page 299 - The formation of an artificial prose style is due entirely to the Sophists, and although they did not at first proceed according to a right method, they may be considered as having laid a foundation for the polished diction of Plato and Demosthenes.
Page 314 - He maintained, that they do not always correspond to the real nature of things, and that there is no infallible method of determining when they are true or false, and consequently that they afford no certain criterion of truth.
Page 300 - ... astonished all his companions. He went barefoot in all seasons of the year, even during the winter campaign at Potidaea, under the severe frosts of Thrace ; and the same homely clothing sufficed for him in winter as well as in summer. His ugly physiognomy excited the jests both of his friends and enemies, who inform us that he had a flat nose, thick lips, and prominent eyes, like a satyr or Silenus.
Page 419 - Hypsicles is the author. The first four and the sixth are on plane geometry ; the fifth is on the theory of proportion, and applies to magnitude in general ; the seventh, eighth, and ninth, are on arithmetic ; the tenth is on the arithmetical characteristics of the divisions of a straight line ; the eleventh and twelfth are on the elements of solid geometry ; the thirteenth (and also the fourteenth and fifteenth) are on the regular solids, which were so much studied among the...
Page 301 - Here he saved the life of another of his pupils, Xenophon, whom he carried from the field on his shoulder, fighting his way as he went.
Page 131 - ... life. He is said to have recommended the lonians, who were menaced by the Persians, to form a federation against their powerful enemy, and to select Teos as the capital. At a later period, we are told he induced the Milesians to withdraw from a union with Croesus against Cyrus. He is also said to have predicted the eclipse of the sun which happened in the reign of Alyattes.
Page 276 - Eight of them were written for judicial purposes in civil cases, and intended to serve as models for this species of oratory. All the others are political discourses, or show-speeches, intended to be read by a large public ; they are particularly...
Page 564 - Thebes, lived toward the end of the tenth and the beginning of the eleventh centuries.

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