Shakespeare's Comedy of the Merry Wives of Windsor: Edited, with Notes

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Harper & Brothers, 1882
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Page 135 - Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten; In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.
Page 134 - Fair lined slippers for the cold, With buckles of the purest gold; A belt of straw, and ivy buds, With coral clasps, and amber studs: And if these pleasures may thee move. Come live with me, and be my love.
Page 135 - If all the world and love were young And truth in every Shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move, To live with thee, and be thy love.
Page 134 - THE PASSIONATE SHEPHERD TO HIS LOVE COME live with me and be my Love, And we will all the pleasures prove That hills and valleys, dale and field, And all the craggy mountains yield.
Page 134 - With a thousand fragrant posies; A cap of flowers, and a kirtle Embroider'd all with leaves of myrtle...
Page 134 - There will we sit upon the rocks And see the shepherds feed their flocks, By shallow rivers, to whose falls Melodious birds sing madrigals.
Page 150 - Through keyholes we do glide ; Over tables, stools, and shelves, We trip it with our fairy elves. And if the house be foul...
Page 133 - If thou couldst, doctor, cast The water of my land, find her disease, And purge it to a sound and pristine health, I would applaud thee to the very echo , That should applaud again.

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