Why Buildings Stand Up: The Strength of Architecture

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1990 - Architecture - 323 pages
8 Reviews
Between a nomad's tent and the Sears Tower lies a revolution in technology, materials, and structures. Here is a clear and enthusiastic introduction to buildings methods from ancient times to the present day, including recent advances in science and technology that have had important effects on the planning and construction of buildings: improved materials (steel, concrete, plastics), progress in antiseismic designs, and the revolutionary changes in both architectural and structural design made possible by the computer.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - janemarieprice - LibraryThing

This is a good basic overview of structural principles and how they work. The writing style grated on me a bit, but I got used to it after a while. I’d recommend for anyone who has a basic interest in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DavidGerstel - LibraryThing

Salvadori's book, together with its companion volume, Why Buildings Fall Down (an even more gripping read, of course), tells a series of fascinating stories to give us a readable, even entertaining, introduction to the principles of structural engineering. Read full review

Contents

Structures
17
The Pyramids
27
Loads
43
Materials
59
Beams and Columns
72
Skyscrapers
107
The Eiffel Tower
126
Bridges
144
The Unfinished Cathedral
206
Domes
225
Hagia Sophia
246
Tents and Balloons
259
The Hanging Sky
278
The Message of Structure
288
Afterword
303
Index
315

The Brooklyn Bridge
165
FormResistant Structures
179

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About the author (1990)

Mario G. Salvadori was a structural engineer and professor of both civil engineering and architecture at Columbia University.

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