How to Make the Garden Pay

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W.H. Maule, 1890 - Gardening - 272 pages
 

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Page 114 - Let us get up early to the vineyards ; Let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, And the pomegranates bud forth : There will I give thee my loves. The mandrakes give a smell, And at our gates are all manner of pleasant fruits, new and old, Which I have laid up for thee, O my beloved.
Page 17 - There was a time when even the rudest methods combined with hard work insured to the market gardener near large cities a good income. But competition has grown with the demand, and with cheapened and increased production prices have gradually declined until now they are far below what only a few years ago growers would have considered mere cost of production.
Page 105 - The first application should be made on the half-grown fruit, and the operation repeated at intervals of ten days or two weeks until the fruit begins to color.
Page 87 - ... requires considerably more than for cabbage, and to be put on oftener. To merely sprinkle the ground when it is very dry is, in my opinion, a damage rather than a benefit, for the following reason : It has a tendency to form a thin, hard crust, both air- and water-tight. Neither the damp air nor the dews will pass through it; neither will a light shower. It requires a heavy rain to dissolve it. Thus, you shut out the benefits to be derived from the cool, damp night air, the heavy dews that we...
Page 92 - The poisons should be thoroughly mixed with water at the rate of from 1 pound to 100 to 250 gallons of water, and applied with a force pump and spray nozzle. In preparing the wash, it will be best to first mix the poison with a small quantity of water, making a thick batter, and then dilute the latter and add to the reservoir or spray tank, mixing the whole thoroughly. When freshly mixed, either London...
Page 17 - Hfnce, people who continue to grow garden crops in the old laborious and unsatisfactoryways, and with old-style implements, who produce inferior vegetables and fruits at old-time cost, cannot successfully meet "he competition of their progressive brethren. This is simply a question of the "survival of the fittest...
Page 87 - It now contains at least forty acres, and as a matter of course the machinery will not raise and distribute water sufficient for even one-half of it. A few things should be remembered by those who contemplate artificial watering. Suppoee that you have one acre of cabbage that you wish to water. To do this fairly well requires at least 30,000 gallons of water ; and this will need to be repeated at least as often as once a week until rain comes. To make strawberries do their best in dry weather requires...
Page 93 - Only a very small flame is needed to produce the required amount of heat. To be of most benefit, this remedy must be applied as soon as possible after the beans or peas are fully ripe.
Page 17 - ... efforts to excel must be made continuously to prevent getting left in this race. This requires the exercise of thought, study — in short of brains as well as of muscle. Excellence will have its reward ; but he who neglects a single point, who allows himself to be excelled by others, is not likely to receive a prize.
Page 87 - ... you have one acre of cabbage that you wish to water. To do this fairly well requires at least 30,000 gallons of water ; and this will need to be repeated at least as often as once a week until rain comes. To make strawberries do their best in dry weather requires considerably more than for cabbage, and to be put on oftener. To merely sprinkle the ground when it is very dry is, in my opinion, a damage rather than a benefit, for the following reason : It has a tendency to form a thin, hard crust,...

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