Women and the Press: The Struggle for Equality

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, Dec 7, 2005 - Social Science - 355 pages
0 Reviews
When Abigail Adams made her famous plea to John Adams to "remember the ladies," the role of advocacy on behalf of U.S. gender equality began its rocky and still uncompleted journey. In Women and the Press, Patricia Bradley examines the tensions that have arisen over the course of this journey as they relate to women in journalism. From their first entrance into the commercial press as sentimental writers, to the present day, the call for gender equality has had special meaning for female journalists. Is there a role, a responsibility, for advocacy, even subversion, in a newsroom setting? This is an account of how women in journalism sought to integrate the need for gender equality with the realities of the journalistic workplace.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Are Not Women Born as Free as Men?
1
2 The Rise of the Professional Writer
19
3 The Legacy of Reform
41
4 The Strains on Sisterhood
67
5 Domesticity and All Its Imperatives
89
6 Negotiating the Newsroom
115
7 Negotiating the Nation
149
8 Finding a Place
183
9 The Second Wave
223
10 Making a Difference
253
Notes
271
Bibliography
313
Index
331
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

Patricia Bradley is professor of journalism and former chair of the Department of Journalism at Temple University. She is the author of Mass Media and the Shaping of American Feminism, 1963-1975 (University Press of Mississippi, 2004).

Bibliographic information