The Public Right to the Universities

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B.L. Green, 1851 - 47 pages
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Page 39 - All observation and all analogy lead us to expect that the sons of Dissenters of the middling class, and it is such alone that we have to look for here, would add strength to that part of our students which we desire to see growing till it absorb all the rest : to that part which includes the quiet, the temperate, the thoughtful, the industrious, those who feel the value of their time, and the dignity of their pursuits. Such Dissenters...
Page 36 - Pelham," said he, affectionately squeezing me by the hand, " your conduct has been most exemplary : you have not walked wantonly over the college grass-plats, nor set your dog at the proctor; nor driven tandems by day, nor broken lamps by night; nor entered the chapel in order to display your intoxication, nor the lecture-room in order to caricature the professors. This is the general behavior of young men of family and fortune ; but it has not been yours.
Page 40 - ... the rest : to that part which includes the quiet, the temperate, the thoughtful, the industrious, those who feel the value of their time and the dignity of their pursuits. Such Dissenters we have had, and have now among us : I wish we had more of them : I should think the advantage of their presence cheaply purchased by any share of our endowments, which, if all were thrown open to competition, they would be able to obtain."1 1 A Letter to Dr.
Page 8 - Gonville and Caius: founded in 1348 by Edmund Gonville as Gonville Hall; removed to its present site in 1353 by William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich; enlarged in 1558 by John Caius. Trinity Hall: founded in 1350 by William Bateman. Corpus Christi: founded in 1352 by the Cambridge guilds of Corpus Christi...
Page 14 - Quod si duodecimum non excesserint, in matriculam duntaxat referentur; utrique tamen postmodo, ubi ad maturam aetatem pervenerint, qua caetera requisita praestare possint, tum demum ea praestare teneantur, sub pœna non sistentium se matriculandos.
Page 17 - July of the following year, but nothing was done. Opinion was, however, crystallising on the relationship of the universities to the State, as can be seen from the pamphlet The Public Right to the Universities, published in 1851 by a 'university man'. He wrote: The university being a public corporation created by the State, having duties entrusted to it for the general good, it is clearly responsible to the State, its creator. The power which created can annul; and if it may annul, it can alter or...
Page 39 - It is grounded on facts which no candid observer can dispute : it is grounded on experiment, which, though limited, is applicable as far as it goes. All observation and all analogy lead us to expect that the sons of Dissenters of the middling class, and it is such alone that we have to look for here, would add strength to that part of our students which we desire to see growing till it absorb all the rest : to that part which includes the quiet, the temperate, the thoughtful, the industrious, those...
Page 8 - Margaret of Anjou, wife of Henry VI, and Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Edward IV.
Page 6 - In the thirteenth of her reign the University of Cambridge was incorporated under the title of the " Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.
Page 45 - ... by an anonymous author who in 1851 published a pamphlet on the Public Right to the Universities in which he forecast: It would be a repetition, in a more Spartan form, of Mrs. Mother-country, of Downing Street, over her unfortunate progeny across the seas. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge would have supreme control over her provincial offshoots; the colonist graduates would have no power even in the sense of that much used phrase of mystery— a 'virtual representation.

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